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Full text of "Riverside Secondary School Yearbook 1960-1961"

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This yearbook was scanned by the Essex County Branch of The Ontario Genealogical Society in 
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of the book. The EssexOGS yearbook scanning project is for preservation and family history 
research purposes by the Essex County Branch membership. 

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Book provided by The Leddy Library, U of Windsor; scanned August 2018 





PATRONS 


DR. AND MRS. N. A. ALEWICK 

MR. AND MRS. S. N. BARKER 

MR. AND MRS. W. E. BEAN 

MR. AND MRS. J. B. CLANCY 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN A. CONNOR 

MR. AND MRS. J. DAVY 

MR. AND MRS. R. J. DOWNEY 

GREETA M. FRENCH, A.T.C.M., R.M.T. 

DR. AND MRS. FULLER 

MR. AND MRS. J. GIFFEN 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES GILLESPIE 

MR. AND MRS. WILFRED F. HARRIS 

MR. AND MRS. J. G. HOBA 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER G. HOWARD 

MR. AND MRS. J. R- HUNTER 

MR. AND MRS. ALBERT E. KING 

DR. AND MRS. L. R. LEFAVE 

MR. AND MRS. E. W. LEWIS 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE S. LINTON 

MR. AND MRS. EARL E. LYNCH 

DR. AND MRS. JOHN H. MAUS 

MR. .AND MRS. M. S. MCALLUM 


MR. AND MRS. B. D. MORRISSEY 
DR. AND MRS. G. MALCOLM MORTON 
MR. AND MRS. J. H. NEWMARK 
MR AND MRS. BEN ORMSETH 
MISS G. JOAN ORMSETH, A.M.U.S. 

MR. AND MRS. E. W. PASTORIUS 
MR AND MRS. JOHN PERKINS 
MR. AND MRS. LAWRENCE W. RELF 
MR. AND MRS. GEO. A. ROBINSON 
MR AND MRS. T. R. RODEN 
MR. AND MRS. W. C. ROTHWELL 
REV. AND MRS. RALPH R. SADLEIR 
DR. AND MRS. G. H. SHEPHERD 
MR. AND MRS. J. C. SNYDER 
MR AND MRS. J. CLAIRE STOREY 
MR. AND MRS. WM. A. THOMAS 
MR AND MRS. K. J. THORN 
MR AND MRS. E I. TOUCHIE 
MR. AND MRS. J. R VAN DIESSEN 
DR AND MRS. A. T. WACHNA 
MR .^ND MRS. A' F. WILLIAMS 
MR AND MRS. A. A. WILSON 


Huniic 

m <8tK\g w ims UB8Ayi it* 

MOT TO fJE TAKEN 
THIS HOOJri 










The opportunites of talking with parents have been all too few this year. That is why I should like to address my 
foreward in the 1961 edition of REBELOGUE especially to the mothers and fathers. 

This attractive edition for which I am again sincerely grateful to the untiring efforts of Miss Trottier and her staff 
as well as to faithful patrons and advertisers reaffirms the pride I have felt over the years in the friendliness, courtesy 
and loyalty of Riverside High School students. Their positive qualities of character are a credit to the homes they come 
from and to the interest their parents show in the preparation for their future. Yet. parents—and teachers, too—are only 
human in that they entertain certain misconceptions about the education we are trying to provide in secondary school. 

The first misconception, though never openly admitted, reveals itself in attitudes which I sense about me. It is that 
Grade 9, albeit an important year, is not really the most essential year. The hurdle of high-school entrance having been 
cleared—it may not have been much of a jump anyway!—there is a feeling on the part of the student that he can “sail 
through** his first year. It is just possible, too, that some of us teachers may be guilty of regarding Grade 9, since it is the 
beginning year, as a sort of inferior challenge to our teaching ability. These attitudes are dangerous for, in high school, 
work takes on a new character. Because students are older, more emphasis is placed upon maturity of expression and judg¬ 
ment than in elementary school. The student must take more responsibility. In the first year, the foundation for all the later 
work is laid, and it is for this reason that Grade 9 is so important. If a student does not learn in his first year to work regu¬ 
larly and systematically, he is almost certain to fail. 

A second misconception concerns extra-curricular activities. There are tremendous pressures, for example, upon a good 
athlete to uphold the name of the school on a winning team. The influences brought to bear upon recognized leaders to direct 
many school organizations are subtle and complex. And there is nothing quite like the thrill of being on a winning team, 
of being part of a worthwhile social project, of holding a respected office in a school organization. 

Yet, valuable as these experiences are, it is a misconception to regard them as the reason for a school’s existence. I am 
convinced that they must be secondary to that true education which one can get only in a classroom and through long hours 
of private study. This is not to say that there is no education in extra-curricular accomplishments. But let us face hard facts 
realistically: the only way we have of evaluating a student’s achievement when he leaves school and of predicting his chance 
of success in advanced education is by the grades he made in his courses. In recent years, many have sacrificed potential high 
grades to the extra-curricular. It takes real strength of character to stick at one’s desk poring over the books in preference to 
enjoying a contribution to the group. The superior and the gifted student can often do both, but my advice to the average 
student is to go after the marks. 

A final misconception concerns homework. The notion that most homework can be done in “spares” has been perhaps 
the greatest of all the causes of failure. Although teachers realize that a great responsibility is theirs in presenting ideas clear¬ 
ly to their students, I am sure they would agree with me when I say that to deny the student the privilege of assimilating 
his studies in the quiet of his own room is to deny him the greater part of education. Even the intelligent student who will 
not waste time at home in “busy work” such as the useless recopying of notes does find homework sometimes onerous. 
Homework, in providing for the mastery of day-to-day work and for the organization of sensible plans of review, can do 
much to reduce foolish examination hysteria which seems to be on the increase. Good habits of home study can build con¬ 
fidence. self-reliance and sane judgment. 

There are, no doubt, good practical reason*, for being aware of the misconceptions which I have sketched. Although I 
cannot altogether accept the theory that higher standards of education will directly alleviate unemployment, certainly the 
complex scientific developments of today are making d^ands upon the highly trained. But my plea is not for the practical. 
It is for a return to that t 3 rpe of education which emphasized the so-called “disciplines,” that education which, while it did 
not permit one to take refuge in the comfort of “groupincss,” developed the individual’s powers of concentration and led 
him into domains of imagination, of absorbing ideas and of truth. 

—Robert F. Walton 




Fa^e One 







FORD MOTOR COMPANY OF CANADA, LIMITED 


preparation for 
the challenges 
and opportunities 
of the future 


Ford of Canada encourages young people 
in their search for education. 

Over the past seven years, 41 university 
scholarships, each for a four-year course 
at a recognized college or university in 
Canada, have been awarded to sons and 
daughters of Ford employees. 

Ford of Canada helps support youth pro¬ 
grams including the very successful 4-H 
Clubs. As well, teaching aids and educa¬ 
tional motion pictures are made available 
to Canadian schools, and, in many com¬ 
munities, our dealers participate in High 
School driver education projects. 

Ford of Canada is proud to be associat^ 
with many educational activities, because 
we believe that a sound education is the 
best preparation for the challenges and 
opportunities of the future. 



ORTH AMERICA'S FINE CARS: Ford • Falcon • Meteor •Comet • Mercury ' SERMA 

ncoln Continental BRITISH FORD LINE; Anglia 105E • Pretect • Consul • Zeghyr • Zodiac GERMAN 
SrD LINE: Taunus FOB INDUSTRY AND AGRICULTURE: Ford Troclis 'Mercury 

^cks • Thames Vans and Busas - Ford Tractors - Fordson Tractors - Fordson Diesel 

irm Implements^ Equipment TO REPLACE QUALITY WITH QUALITY; Genuine Ford P^rts 


Pag^e Two 



REBELOGUE STAFF 



Editor,..Lynch 
Assistant Editor Mary Martin 

Advertising Manager .,.Harry Woodcml 

Business Manager Ken Thorn 

Photography...Logan 

Patrons Dick (Tiffen 

Layout ..Burbridgc 

Jeanne Bruce 
Lynda Emerson 

Advisor _vr*«v;v< 4 ^--Miss Trottier 
Typists Mollans 

Dave Baker 
Shirley Shisarchnk 
Ritva Haiitala 
Judy Jansen 

Assistants.Carol Harvey 

Caro! Hancox 
Sandy Heplnirn 
Shir lev Slusarchuk 
Sally Gelling 

On liehalf of th;* Rebelogue staB> 1 would like 

to take this opporumity to thank Miss Trottkfr for 

her assistance and guidance in the preparation of the 

Rebelogue. 

1 would also like to thank ^liss Balk will and her 
typing classes for their excellent work. Mr, GorskiN 
help was also greatly appreciated. 

At this time the Kehelogue staff would like to 
wish the graduates the best of luck in their future 
studies, 

Carol fiarvey 



W^w 

wFm 1Fi«rm\Tl^l9[ 

A mlA JUI Ai 





S e a t « d < LafI to 
Right); l-Inda VoUana, 
Gw«n Burkhart, Colleen 
Howard. Judx Kersey, 
Ken Thorn. Bob Lynch, 
Mary Martin, Harry 
Woodend, David Logan, 
Carol Harvey. Janice 
Moore, Jeanne Bruce. 

First Row (Standing, 
Seated Left to Righf): 
Peter Budwin, Ritva 
Hautala, Lynne Adair, 
Susan Downey, Sandra 
Hepburn, Lynda Bmer* 
son, Sally Gellingi Carol 
Burbridge. Judy Jansen. 
Carol NaneoK, Ihlriey 
Slusarchuk. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right); David Baker, 
Doug Mercer, David 
Tarcia, Ronald Wad- 
dington, John Maxwell, 
Peter Loarlng, Ron Al¬ 
lan, Don Kincaidf Rod 
Smith, Dick Gif fen, 
Lyall Hughes. 


Page Three 





















Opening more doors to opportunity 


A university education is the key that opens doors to better 
employment opportunities and the chance to build a 
successful career. 

Many students with ambition and outstanding ability are 
unable to attend university because of lack of sufficient 
funds. In 1955. the seven General Motors companies 
operating in Canada put a university education within 
reach of some of these students by setting up the General 
Motors Canadian Scholarship Programme 

Twenty five scholarships are awarded each year and. up to 
the present, 172 students have received awards ranging in 
value to S2.000. The choice of one of 14 universities and of 
faculty rests entirely with the students and their advisors. 
An equally imporunt part of the GM Scholarship Pro* 
gramme is the allocation of funds to the universities them¬ 
selves to help maintain and improve the quality of education. 

GENERAL 


General Motors, through its Scholarship Programme, helps 
many deserving students develop their capabilities to the 
full—thus preparing them for the important part they will 
play in Canada*s future. 


Applications for General Motors Scholarships should 
be directed to the Registrars of the following paitici* 
pating universities: The University of Toronto: the 
University of Western Ontario, London: Queen's Unh 
versity, Kingston; the University of Montreal; the Univer^ 
sity of Manitoba, Winnipeg: the University of British 
Columbia, Vancouver: the University of Saskatchewan, 
Saskatoon: the University of Alberta, Edmonton: Dab 
housie University, Halifax; the University of Hew Bruns¬ 
wick, Fredericton: Laval University, Quebec City; McGill 
University, Montreal: Memorial University, St, John's, 
Newfoundland: and Me Master University, Hamilton, 


MOTORS 


Growing with Canada 


Page Knur 














HONOUR 

GRADUATES 



Name: Sue Bean. 

Sch.: Act.: Studying Piano. 
Char.; Quiet as a mouse. 
Amb.; Teacher. 



Name: Pat Berthiaume. 

Sch. Act.: Library Club* Raider. 

ettes, Prefect, Volleyball Ref. 

Char.2 Sweet Sixteen. 

Amb.: grow older. (Airline Ste¬ 
wardess). 


Name: Randy Brown. 

Sch. Act.: Bowling, homework. 
Char.: Blushing traffic ticket 
collector. 

Amb.: First rat In the race over 
the finish line. (Engineer). 



Name: Paul *Xhooch** Carr. 
Sch. Act.* Key Club, Bowling, 
AYPA. 

Char.t Loose-toothed smile. 
Amb.: Skypllot. (Anglican cler- 

ayv 



Name: Fred Cooper. 

Sch. Act.: Bowling. 

Char.: 5000-word history essays. 
Amb.: Mass produce Yogi Bear 
Beanie Caps. 



Name: Elizabeth Day. 

Sch. Act.: President Red Cross, 
Student Council, Prefect. 
Char.: Red-head. 

Amb.; Home Economist. 



Name: Blaire Durbin. 

Sch. Act.: Basketball (Referee 
and Interform), Volleyball* 
Student Council, Athletic Soc., 
Badminton, Prefect. 

Char.: chief homework lender. 

Amb.: To return from Paris 
(Pharmaceutical Chemistry at 
U. of T.). 



Name: Paul Hewitt. 

Sch. Act.: Bowling* Interform 
Basketball and Football. 
Char.: Swingingllt 
Amb.: To be a gym-rat. (Get to 
Western). 



Name: Ken King “Rex.»» 

Sch. Act.: Prefect* Bowling. 
Char.: French lover. 

Amb.: 76% In French (R. M. C.) 



Name: Betty Landauer. 

Sch. Act.; ISCF, Prefect, Piano, 
Raiderettes* 19 spares a week! 
Char.: Bowling average of 38! { 
Amb.: Break 50 in Bowling. 
(Teacher). 



Name: Mary MacPherson. 

Sch. Act.: Student Council 
(Pres.)* Prefect. 

Char.: Always rushing around. 
Amb.; To own a sports car. 
(R.N.). 



Name: Scott Mclntlre. 

Sch. Act.: Track, Key Club, Stu¬ 
dent Council (Treas.)* Athletic 
Society* Prefect, Essex & Kent 
Scottish. Bowling. 

Char.; Engineering genius with 
a burned-out Hi-Fi. 

Amb.: To Depose Fidel Castro. 
(Civil Engineer). 


Page Five 
















Name: D5ck O’Callaghan “Runt/' 
Sch. Act.: Football. Basketball. 
Track. Key Club. Student 
Council. Prefect, Raiders. 
Char.: Charming!! 

Amb.: Join Harlem Globetrot¬ 
ters. (Engineering^. 



Name: Ingrid Stahl. 

Sch. Act.: Sr. Basketball. Pre¬ 
fect. Ralderettes. 

Char.* Unfinished geography 
homework. 

Amb.: Geography major. (B.A. 
in languages). 



Name: Peter Wakefield. 

Sch. Act.: Bowling League, Pre¬ 
fect, 

Char.: Curly Blond Hair, 

Amb.: Business Administration 
at Assumption. 



Name: Bob Relf. 

Sch. Act.: Cadet Rifle Team, 
Prefect Captain, Soccer Team. 
Char.: Sports enthusiast! 

Amb.: Bachelor of Commerce at 
Assumption. 



Name: Pete Syrlng “Sweets.** 
Sch. Act.: Football, Track, Ath¬ 
letic Soc., Bowling. Raiders. 
Char.: Pool Shark! 

Amb.: Have a farm next to 
Robinson. (Medicine). 



Name; Beth Washington. 

Sch. Act.: Ralderettes, Prefect. 
Char.: Shoes!! 

Amb.: Teacher (Public School). 



Name; Gary Robinson. 

Sch. Act.: Key Club, Student 
Council, S.S. Teacher^ Prefect. 
Char,; Loves cats! Especially in 
the lab. 

Amb.: Farmer. 



Name: Betty Thomas. 

Sch. Act.: Running from the 
cafeteria to Room 1 between 
8:56 and 8:57 A.M. 

Char.; Little Blue Car. 

Amb.: Teacher???? 



Name: Bill White. 

Sch. Act.: Football, Hockey. 

Track. Athletic Soc., Bowling. 
Char.: Hanging Shirt-tall. 

Amb.: Anything but a plumber. 
(Engineering). 



Name: Dave Williamson. 

Sch. Act.: Bowling Team, mak¬ 
ing friends. 

Char.: Mad Bongo-drum Player. 
Amb.: Scoff pipes for Whlte*s 
Plumbing Co. (Certified Public 
Accountant). 



Name: Bryan Rodle “Monk.** 
Sch. Act.: Football, Bowling 
Club. Raiders. 

Char.: Monk. 

Amb.: Electrical Engineer. 



Name: Jane Wachna. 

Sch, Act.: Prefect, Badminton 
Club. 

Char.: Mrs. Raymond’s favourite 
upper school iLatln student 
(one only). 

Amb.: Foreign Service after U. 
of T. 



Name: Bob Williams. 

Sch. Act.: AYPA. 

Char.; Another Red-head. 
Amb.: Teaching. 


Page Six 






















Co m in encpm e n t 


The annual Conimcncenient Kxercij^es were held on December 21, 1S>60, Most of the i^aduales 
returned from university to I)e present. This year was the first year tlial the .school had its own 
graduation gowns, donated by the Rclielogue. 

The exercise.s were preceeded by a dinner held at the United Church, The Reverend Scarth 
MacDonald deliveied the invocation, followed by the Chairman of the Board of Ivducation, Mrs. 
Davis who offered some words of encouragement to the graduates. Mayor Gordon Stewart was un¬ 
able to attend, but Doctor Ballard of the Council came in his place. The high point of the evening 
was an address by Rabbi Samuel S. Stollman. who delivered a most interesting speech, lie stressed 
the importance of education today and added many of his own experiences and observations. Every¬ 
one present enjoyed thoroughly and appreciated his address. Dennis Burling, tlie Valedic¬ 
torian, gave an exceedingly humorous speech, citing different epi.sodes that had occurred in class 
during the past year. 

Mr. Walton assisted by members of the Staff and Board, awarded the diplomas, class medals, and 
intermediate certificates. 


Many of the graduates won scholarships and bursaries. Donna Barton received a Provincial 
Ciovernment Stipend Bursary, and a scholarship from Ryerson Institute of Technology. Dennis Bur¬ 
ling obtained an Admission Scholarship from Assumption University, a Dominion-Provincial Student 
Aid Bursary, a Kiwanis Club of Riverside Scholarship, and a Student Council Bursary. Dorit Kriss 
won an Admission Scholarship from Assumption University, a Riverside Police Association Bur¬ 
sary and a Student Council Bursaiy. Ingrid Stahl received the Riverside Mary Grant Society Scholar¬ 
ship for the highest proficiency in (irade Twelve. Herb Summers received the Ford Motor Company 
of Canada Scholaiship. Peggy \'arah obtained a Scholarship from the National Secretaries Associ¬ 
ation and a Student Council Bursary. Judy Wachna received a Student Council Bursary, Keith Ward 
was awarded a Michigan Students* Aid Foundation Bursary. 


Congratulations to all the 
their future endeavours. 


graduates on behalf of the entire student body, and best wishes for 

Mary MaePherson 


Cl as s M ed alls / a* 


Grade 9A—Frances Tako 

Robert Krivoshein 

Grade 9B—Irene Wojzuik 
Grade 9C—^Jane Johnston 
Grade 9D—^John Loaring 
Grade 9E—Carol Fisher 
Grade lOA—Blair Morrissey 
Grade lOB—Kenneth Woodall 
Grade IOC—John Tweedie 


Grade lOD—Alex Robinson 
Grade lOE—Suzanne Bernhardt 
Grade llA^John Maxwell 
Grade IIB—Karen Ardiel 
Grade 12A—Ingrid Stahl 
Grade 12B—Elizabeth Day 
Grade 12C—Monica Erwied 
Grade 13—Dorit Kriss 


Where Are The Teachers? 

Miss Balkwill _ Page 55 

Miss Barr . Page 44 

Miss Clary ..Page 26 

Mr. Giles - . Page 42 

Mr. Giroux... Page 58 

Mr. Gorski . Page 58 

Mr. Krewench . Page 52 

Mr. Mascaro ..Page 28 

Mr. Medd . Page 54 

Mr. Melville . .. Page 24 

Mr. O’Gorman .. Page 38 

Mrs. Pavezka .Page 38 

Mrs. Raymond .Page 51 

Mr. Sabo ..Page 46 

Miss Trottier . Page 50 

Mr. Winterton .. Page 56 


Page Seven 


























Clam shells, doglegs, and catwalks 


How to talk like a car stylist 

Bill Weaver learns the lingo of the car stylists—you can, too! 

And next time you’re talking about the 1961 cars, 
you’ll really sound **tuned in!’ 



"We believe in poise," our stylists told Bill 
Weaver, and you can see it for yourself in every 
1961 car from Chrysler Corporation. Read a line 
down any one of these cars and youUl see a fleet 
sweep from header to deck lid. 

These hot looks work for a living, too. With 
new, one-piece Unibody Construction, there’s 
plenty of stretch-out-and-relax room inside, 
under the belt line and up in the greenhouse. 
And there’s no dogleg in the windshield post to 
bang your knees on, either. 

Want to get a first-hand reading of these 
four-wheeled jewels? Ask Dad to stop in at the 
dealer’s with you, real soon, and take a turn in 
the cars that drive as fleet as they look. As the 
car stylists say, they’re hot! 


AppUqui: chrome moulding 
BacklltP! rear windo>^ 

Bmit lino: line between upper 
structure and lower body 

Blister: bump over wheel for 
clearance 

Catwalk: space between fender 
and hood 

Clam shall: oval shroud formed in 
sheet metal, like headlight covering 

Clean: absence of moulding 
CV: circulating ventilation: small 
swinging windows 

Deck lid: door to luggage 
compartment 

Doglag: bend in windshield post 
projecting into front door opening 


Dutch man: metal panel between 
rear window and deck Ud 

Flaat: having a look of motion 

Oraanhousa: upper part of car, 
including glass area 
Haadar: top moulding of grille — 
structural member above windshield 

Mot: advanced 

Read a line: sight a line 

Sassy: having a look of high 

performance 

Singing: gleaming 

Swaap: long gradual curve 

Tunad In: man knows what he’s 

doing 

Wlndspllt! sharp crease in surface 
that ’‘splits the wind” 


Chrysler Corporation of Canada Ltd* 

Serving Canada’s new quest for quality 
Plymouth Valiant * Dodge Dart Simca * Fiat Chrysler Imperial 

Dodge Trucks Fargo Trucks 


Page Eight 














STUDENT COUNCIL 



.... Jl 


Seated, Left to Right: Linda, Carbcrry, Jane Ann Bower, Elizabeth Day, Scott Mclntire, Blaire Durbin, 
Mary MacPherson (Pres.). Lynda Emerson (Sec.), Dick O’Callaghan (Vice-Pres.), Gary Robinson, Carol 
Little, Jane Johnston, Susan Livingstone. 

Middle, Left to Right: Brian Horn, Blair Morrissey, Janet Davidson, Shirley Everett, Susan Fuller, Candy 
Aytoun, Sharon Pretty. Lorelei Tripp, Nyla O'Connor, Janice Allen, Sandra Bailie, Tom Smith, Mr. 
O’Qorman. 

3rd Row, Left to Right; Bobby Gratto, Charles Giles, Dwayne Duke. Rodger Touchie, Jim Allan, Don Grant, 
Bob Richardson, Hanko Senger, John Maxwell, Herbert Miller, Ross Miles, Robert Goodfellow. 


Ill Stpleiiibi^r 1960, Mary MacPherson and Dick O'Callaghaii tvere elected Head (lirl and Head 
Hoy of the Student Body. Scot Mclntire was elected as Treasurer and Uynda Emerson as Secretary. 

As ill the past years the first school project was a magazine subscription drive. With the pro¬ 
fits, four bleachers were purchased for the Athletic Field. 

The Graduation Commencement was held on December 21 witli a dinner before and a dance fol¬ 
lowing the exercise. 


A Christmas .Assembly was organized and small gifts were given to teachers and .some students. 
.Again this year the Student Council paid for spectator buses to the out-of-town basketball games. 
On March 24 a special dance was held with the disc-jockey, Joe Vann. 

Lynda Emerson, Jane .Ann Bower, Linda Carbcrry. Blaire Durbin, Shirley Everett, and Ross 
Miles were convenors of the Maytime Rajisody which was held on May 12. Couples danced to the 
music of W'ally Townsend and as always the queOn of the ball was chosen. 

The members of the Student Council of 1960-61 wish to give many thanks to their Student 
Council advisor, Mr. OXiorman. 

Lynda Emerson 


Page Nine 












Strong and honourable traditions provide tlic 

foundation of firm training in leadership 
expressed today in the motto of the three 
Canadian Scr>'ices Colleges: Trulh-Duty-Valour. 
Allied to the prestige of the past is 
a university degree education 

given by these colleges to the oflicer- 
cadets of Canada\s armed forces. Carefully 
selected high school graduates are trained 
for challenging professional careers as 
officers in the Navy, Army or Air force, 
for the responsibility of holding 

the Queen^s Commission. 




OLIEOE MlllTAmE ftOYAt 
, OE SAINT.JEAN 
»^INT-JEAN. P.Q.. 


Through the Regular Officer Training 
Plan (ROTP) the Department of Na¬ 
tional Defence will sponsor a limited 
number of qualified high school gradu¬ 
ates to obtain a university degree edu¬ 
cation, either at the Canadian Services 
Colleges or at designated Canadian 
universities. Full details of this spon¬ 
sored education can be obtained with¬ 
out obligation from vour nearest Armed 
Forces Recruiting tentre, or by mail¬ 
ing thb coupon now. 

^Closing date for candidates applying 
for 1961 fall classes is 1 July l^P. 


TS.61.3HS A. REV. 


Director ROIT 
NDHQ. OTTAWA, anada 

PlcaK send to me full information on the Regular Officer Training Plao 

Name ..... 

Address ... 

City/Town ... 

Age ..Education...... 


I 
I 

I Sctirice Cboict 

I 


Navy □ 


Army □ 


Air Force □ 


Page Ten 























Front Row (Left to Rtght): Gale Purdy, 
Ritva Hautala, Janice Moore, Gwen Burk* 
hart, Colleen Howard, Judy Keraey, San* 
dra Millar, Jeanne Bruce, Sandra Lever, 
Lynn Adair, Susan Downey. 

Middle Row (Left to Right'); Helmut 
Ferber, Mary Martin, Carol Harvey, Shir* 
ley Siusarchuk, Carol Hancox, Judy Jan¬ 
sen, Sandra Hepburn. Linda Vollans, Sally 
Gelling, Lynda Emerson. Carol Burbridge, 
At Strachan. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Alex David¬ 
son, Ron Allan, Ron Waddington. John 
Maxwell, Frank Swiston, Bill Powers, Ken 
Thorn, Nelson Orthner, Pete Loaring, Bob 
Rich, Mike Ward, Craig Allen. Jim Duck, 
Gary Snyder. 




The j^lobal situation in the re¬ 
mote spiiere of Riverside High 
becomes increasingly difficult, 
especially in the riot torn jungle 
area, 12A. 

There, chief of the seven foot 
tall Watussis, Sally Gelling and 
the Pygmy leader, Judy Kersey 
have joined forces to fight in¬ 
vaders of their native territory*. 
Craig Allen, devoted (jueen of the 
jungle, and Mike Ward. 

U.N. troops under peace medi¬ 
ators Gary Snyder, Lynne Ro¬ 
den and Nelson Orthner have 
been called out to quel the tribes¬ 
men. 

The Great White Hunter, Ron 
Allan is still trying to conquer 
Latin and Mrs. Raymond. The 
explorers, Pete Loaring and Alex 
Davidson are searching for the 
North West Passage to better 
Latin marks. 




CLASS COLUMN 12A 

(dll the eastern front Mary 
Martin is making great strides 
in Chemistry, l ate reports indi¬ 
cate that Mr. Byng is in fair con¬ 
dition following her last experi¬ 
ment. 

In the sports almanac. Carol 
Hancox, Carol Harvey and Shir¬ 
ley Siusarchuk have received 
()lympic medals. Lynda Emer¬ 
son, Carol Burbridge and Randy 
Howard have broken all records 
for beauty and poise, 

12A is sending two delegates 
to the Summit Conference on 
j)eaceful relations namely, Sandy 
Millar and A1 Strachan. 

In the South Seas, Sandra Le¬ 
ver, Judy Jansen. Helmet Ferber, 
Bill Powers, cind Frank Swiston 
are still uprising and there is talk 
that a native war feast will soon 
take place. 

In the Musical World. Jean 
Bruce and Ritva Hautala are re¬ 




ceiving praise for their accom¬ 
plishments. 

From Hollywood comes word 
that Sandy Hepburn the great 
director and star actors. Gale 
Purdy, Susan Downey, Bob Rich, 
Janice Moore and Jim Duck are 
still receiving praises for their 
new award winning production. 

Top candidates for the Nobel 
|)rize for high marks are Gwen 
Burkhart, Ron Waddington, and 
John Maxwell. Which one will it 
be? 

In the world situation there re¬ 
mains one (luestion — Lynn 
Adair’s absenteeism. It is ru¬ 
mored that she is really chasing 
•‘Rainbows." 

Here is the world situation of 
12A in brief and this is your 
friendly reporter, Mary Martin, 
signing off. 

by Mary Martin 


Page Elevci^ 










CAREERS IN 
BUSINESS 

High School graduates frequently decide upon 
a business position as their best career choice. 
Where should a graduate go to obtain the best 
possible training to fit him or her for a top 
business position? 

Train in the school that since 1903 has 
specialized in business education. Don't be 
satisfied with less than the best. 

TRAIN IN THE SCHOOL THAT WILL DO THE MOST 

FOR YOU! 

WINDSOR 

BUSINESS COLLEGE 

R. J. SERVICE, Principal 

709 OuelieHe Avc. CL 3-4921 


Page Twelve 




Front Row (Left to Right): Peggy Up¬ 
ton, Sharon Parmeter, Beth Montgomery, 
Sharon Brian, Shirley Everett, Karen Ar- 
diei, Marcia Brown Elizabeth Lazuiruk, 
Jackie Davis, Marian MacKinnon, Pam 
Fellows, Wanda Batke, Ann Tofflomirc, 
Barbara Smith. 

Middle Row (Left to Right): Roddy 
Smith. Don Kincaid, David Tarcia. Paul 
Kiefaber, Raymond Matthews, David Ba¬ 
ker, Peter Budwin, Bill Wakeley. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Ross Miles, 
Bill Voy, Larry Relf, Jim Storey. Harry 
Woodend, Dennis Duff, Wayne Norbraten. 
David Caicott, Vincent Castonguay, David 
White. 


CLASS COLUMN 12B 


The cla.'^s t>f 12H writes a^ain. 
As Mr. Sabo enters the Bastille 
he observes Dave Tarcia and 
Larry Relf frantically chippinj*: 
icicles off the radiator. When 
asked ‘AVhere would yon j^o to 
find a wanner room than this?” 
they reply in unison “North To 
Alaska.” Mr. Sabo then asks 
Jackie Davis what time it is, and 
.she promptly sprinj^s to her feet 
shouting “It’s Pony Time.” Mr. 
Sabo replies *T’m Sorry” but it’s 
lest lime as Wayne Norbraten 
sinks into his seat sighing ”Gee 
Whiz” and Dennis Duff cries out 
*T Don’t Like It But I Guess 
Things Happen That Way.” 
During the test Mr. Sabo asks 
Barb Smith where .she gets all 
her information Barb answers 
“Got An Angel On My Shoulder.” 
Marian MacKinnon and Ann 
Tcfflemire promptly turn around 
to talk with Barb’s “Angel Baby.” 
tHir history loving chief Dave 
White exclaims as the period 
ends “Please Mr, Sabo? I Don’t 
Want To Go.” 

Our next cla.ss with Miss Trot- 
tier is interrupted by Harry 
Woodend asking if he may “Take 
A Message To Mary.” Tall Paul 


Kiefaber is sent to ]nill down the 
map while Rod Smith is over¬ 
heard telling Marcia Brown that 
he will bet her “A Million To 
One” that Paul can’t reach it. 
When Sharon Parmeter (juestions 
Beth Montgomery about wherj 
she is going for her Itaster holi¬ 
days Beth r^M)Iies; I am going 
“Where The Boys Are.” At the 
ind of the period Miss Trotlier 
tells Bill Wakely “You Talk Too 
Much.” 

Ik-forc arriving at the French 
loom Don Kincaid tell.s Sharon 
Brian and Shirley Everett that 
he hasn’t got his homework and 
he’s got “Chills And Fever.” 
Dave Parmeter asks Bill Voy if 
he has his Injinework done. Bill 
replie.s “Don’t Worry About Me.” 
Mr. O’Gorman says that since 
he thinks no one ha.s his home¬ 
work done he will give a test 
“Dedicated To The One I Love.” 
Ray Mattnews, when Vince Cas¬ 
tonguay blurts out “Wait Just A 
Minute” 1 have mine done. .Mr. 
f^l’Ciorman cancels the test and 
Liz Lazuiruk sighs “C’est Si 
Bon.” 

Our next period, a study is 
filled with “Sweet Nothings” 
whispered l>y Wanda Batke? 


Dave Caicott? and Peggy Upton. 
Pam Fellows .say.s the reason she 
gets so many rebounds in basket¬ 
ball is because she’s “Like A 
Rubber Ball.” David Baker, our 
star goalie, says he feels like a 
“Lonely Boy” when left unpro¬ 
tected during a hockey game. 
Karen Ardiel has decided to 
“Shop Around” before choosing 
a college to attend. 

.Vext we go to Chemistry 
where the boys at the l)ack are 
wondering what attraction Lon¬ 
don has for Jim Storey when 
someone offers a solution, “Jim¬ 
my’s Girl.” On checking home¬ 
work, Mr. Byng finds that Ross 
Miles homework is hastily done. 
.Mr. J^yiig cjueslions Ross as to 
when he does his homework, to 
which Ko.ss rejdies, “Na. Na, Na, 
Na. Na, Na, Na. Na, Na. Late At 
Night.” Pete Budwin receives a 
detention for not having his 
homework done. Mr. Byng asks 
Pete. “Will You Still Love Me 
Tomorrow?” Pete replies. “May¬ 
be.” 

Other column readers, we hope 
you have enjoyed this column. 
W e know, hecaiuse the eyes of 
“Clarke Smathers” are upon you. 

Jim Storey and Bill Wakeley 


Page Thirtec!! 











11A 



Front Row (Left to Right): Nyla OXon. 
nor, Lynn Roaich, Elizabeth Barron. 
Catharine Hindmarsh, Joyce Russell. Diane 
Morton. Blanche Rivard, Maya van Dles- 
sen. Elijn Russell. Margaret Brady Sue 
Taylor, 

Middle Row (Left to Right): Peter Ma¬ 
loney, Nell St. Clair. Jim Hussey, Ken 
Woodall, Gordon WIrch, Eric Morgan, 
Gordon Thompson, Robert McAllum, Al¬ 
bert La Fleur. Randy Austin, Larry 
Coughlin. 

Back Row (Left to Right); Walter Pas- 
torius, Richard Alewick, David Kellington, 
David Merschback, Bruce Stott. Bennet 
Ormseth. Roger Touchle, Jurl Kasemets, 
David MacKay, George Lewis. Ron Kocela, 
Richard LeFave. Bruce Davidson. Michael 
Loaring. 


11B 


Front Row (Left to Right): Margaret 
Hodut, Anne Davy, Carol Payne, Jenny- 
Lynn Ford, Rhoda Fowkes, Carol Cowley. 
Linda Brown, Gail Lewis, Marlon dc Vaan. 
Sheila Wonsch. Judy Steet, Suzanne 
Bernhardt. 

Second Row (Left to Right); Janet 
Davidson, Barbara Howie, Marg Wiseman, 
Elayne Gilbert. Gail Grahm, Nancy Hous- 
ley, Darlene Peters. 

Back Row (Left to Right^t Lyall 
Hughes. Rick Faulkner, Ted Pickering, 
Mike Wilson, Dave Logan. Ken Wilson, 
Wayne Harris, Blair Morrissey. 




11C 

Front Row (Left to Right): Eleanor 
Seary, Maxine Watters, Nancy White, 
Christine Chandler, Carolyn Eve, Margltta 
Wiedemann, Marianne Langlois. Monica 
Menn, Vera MacMillan, Sharon Robinson, 
Cheryl Tripp, Linda Carberry. 

Second Row (Left to Right): Jack Ochs, 
Rickey Milne, John Faul, Beverly Martin, 
Sally Barlow. Pat Snider, Sandra Wilson, 
Bonnie Brown, Allan Rothwell, Dick Gif- 
fen. 

Back Row (Left to Right): David Con¬ 
nors, Dwayne Duke, Douglas Topiiffe, 
Brent Manor, Larry Girard. Ron Roberts. 


Page Fourteen 


















11D 



Front Row (Left to Right): Jane Anne 
Bower, Barbara Smith, Jane Pendlebury, 
Diane Carriere. Beverley Schneider, Sheila 
Georges. Lynne Burnie, Janet Murphy. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Clive Tom¬ 
kins, Ted Williams. Tom Skinner, Tom 
Ryan. John Andriash. Robert Luck Baker, 
Lome Rawling. Larry Meyers. Tom Smith. 




10A 

Front Row (Left to Right): Lorrie Kirk, 
Pamela Duncan, Marjorie Kay, Ann Ferry, 
Linda Hipson, Pat Booth, Joyce Bolton, 
Wendy Burbrldge. Faye Campbell, Janis 
Burleigh, Sandy Baine, Jill Clendenlng. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Karen 
Flewelling, Audrey Hillman. Forest Shan¬ 
non, Janie Johnston, Kathy Andrews, 
Kathy Dell, Gail Hancox, Claire Levas- 
seur, Judy Jones, Sharon Brown, Sheila 
Kelton. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Charles Giles, 
Peter Baxter, Harris Grossman, Ron 
Fauteux, Virgil Duff, Greig Holder^ Doug 
Connor, Mike Hoba, Terry Clark, Dennis 
Ford, Bruce Jardine. 


10B 


Front Row (Left to Right); Laura Stev¬ 
enson, Judy Quarrington, Margaret Mor¬ 
rison, Frances Tako, Ute Preussel, Olga 
Sigmund. Carol Solomchuk, Susan Livlng- 
«one. Beverly Smith, Brenda Steel. Nancy 


Centre Row (Left to Right): Theresa 
^aly, Corina Ocolisan, Julie Brennan. 
Jacquiline Spearin, Ellen Wood, Lois 
Stevens, Lois Manney, Frances Munroe, 
Reva Reid, Ann Powers, Marilyn Mallaby, 
Susan Whitley. 


Back Row (Left to Rlghty. Tom New- 
mark. Bob Linton. Tom Millar. Larry 
Western, Ken Winch, Walter Samann. 
Herbert Miller, Jim Robinson, Rbbert 
Lindquist, Jack Kltson, Phil Street. 



Page Fifteen 


















10C 





Front Row (Left to Right); Ruth Dun¬ 
can, Sheila Wright, Karen Johnson, Kathy 
Kelly. Irene Wojaluk, Ruby Thrasher, 
Irene Maki, Sandra Legget, Jane Clancy, 
Barbara Day, Jo-anne Gillespie, Susan 
Fuller. 

Centre Row (Left to Right); John Loar- 
Ing. Graham Gould. Dave Dent, Ronald 
Young, Kenneth Moore, Robert Krlvosheln, 
Elrle Seppata, Richard Moran. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Henry Siplla, 
Harry Geldhof, Boyne Wiseman. Paul 
White, Preston Smith, Robert Taylor, 
Wayne Long, Ozzle Stahl. Robert Richard¬ 
son, Scott Wright, Paul Waldon. 


10D 

Front Row (Left to Right): Joanne 
Gratto. Catherine Crump, Janet Ireland. 
Gall Gratto. Monica Phillips, Eileen TIede. 
Brenda Cheetham, Susan Ardlel. Carole 
Fisher. Evelyn Debrecen, Nancy Thom- 
son, Marion Yates. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Kay Wal¬ 
lace. Linda Ovens. Sandra Balllle, Mar¬ 
garet Tofflemire. Joy Stlnchcombe. Gaye 
Webb, Carol Lyon, Bonnie Wells, Linda 
Westlake. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Bob Simp¬ 
son. Bob Balllle. Barrie Warnock. David 
Ascott, Dennis Gervals, Bob Mussciman. 
Bob Goodfellow, David Higglnbottom, Bob 
Meloche, Paul Peacy, Ron Unger. 




9A 

Front Row (Left to Right): Edith Mil¬ 
lar, Nan Holland. Candy Aytoun, Janet 
Sadirir, Janet Peacey, Heather Sadleir, 
Cathy McLelland, Pam Alewick, Anne 
Emerson, Linda Moore, Mary Holod, 
Dorothy Landauer. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Chris 
Steed, Brian Barker, Elizabeth Higgin- 
bottom, Ellen Brown, Marg Woodall. 
Nancy Murphy, Beth Purdy, Lynne Voyce. 
Sandy Richardson, Mary Smith, Rob 
Hornsey, Denny Courrier. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Danny Mac- 
Pherson, John Western, Heinz Erwled, 
Vic Izgherian. Ray Radojevich, Don Grant, 
Rod Brown, Jim Shepherd, Jay Jones, 
Barry Carter, Nick Lafieur. 


Page Sixteen 




















9B 


Front Row (Left to Right): Judy Burk¬ 
hart, Catherine Caicott, Janice Alien. 
Elizabeth Harvey, Heather Mann, Pat 
Craig, Marjorie Coulson, Bonnie Budwin, 
Yvonne Shuker, Olga Wynarchuk, Susan 
Clifford. 

Middle Row (Left to Right): Oreg 
Brown, Allen Handy, John Bastion, Susan 
Archibald, Candy Campbell, Marcia Bar¬ 
ron, Nancy Bertram, Susan Bates. Peggy 
Adair, Janice Beaudoin. Bobby Qratto, 
Glenn Smith. Wayne Yared. 


Back Row (Left to Right): Ian Davy, 
Sandy Douglas. Chris DeWolfe, Peter 
Drury, Gordon Gosling, Peter McCailum. 
Chris Emmott, Grant Harrison, Gary 
Ambrose, Tom Geary. 




9C 

Front Row (Left to Right): Caroline 
Fotheringham, Aline Stannard, Brenda 
Fryer, Sharon Pretty, Marilyn Dowkes, 
Barbara Fields, Lee Cutler, Jill Sgrazzutti, 
Diane Davis, Liza Falls. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Hugh Me- 
kay, Barry Jones, Gail Evans. Heather 
Freeman. Geri Day, Linda Gazo, Cheryl 
Ford. Cathy Fowkes, Carol Pearce. Donna 
Gohm, Pat Patrick, Barbara McClellan. 
Bob Manor, Elliott Lyons. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Alan Phillips. 
Brian Horn, Gordon King. Don Master, 
Frank Lachance. John Wetherup, Wayne 
Plumb. Ken Harris, Rodger Linton, 
Michael Hunter. 


9D 

Front Row (Left to Right): Jaye Reid. 
Leslie Wilson, Joan Orthner, Pat Hutchi¬ 
son, Peggy Haley, Carol Little, Linda 
Maxwell, Cathy Prestanski, Darlene Roy, 
Gall Hillman. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Alan Coul- 
son, Uta Kuhn. Cheryl Peters, Peggy Pol- 
hlll. Marilyn Handsor, Carol Quick, Janice 
Gohm, Carol Lowe. Connie Larkin, Tom 
Tweney. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Wayne 
Ocoiisan, Dennis Kostescu, Doug Mercer, 
Earl Morris, Ken Matthew. Philip Ochs, 
Hanko Senger, Peter Perkins, Colin 
Rickerby, Tom Hawkin, Gary Huckle, 
Roger Maus, Ian Niemi, Don Ferguson. 



Page Seventeen 























9E 

Front Row (Left to Right): Diane Web¬ 
ber, Eleanor Touchle, Lorelei Tripp, 
Brenda Taylor, Mary Williams, Sandra 
Tuck, Angela irabelll, Maureen Shaw, 
Susan Talacko, Judy Tahlll, Gall Burdette, 
Gloria Kempson. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Doug Simp¬ 
son, Linda Waddington, Jo-Ann Peltier, 
Bonnie Weiss, Margrit Senger, Rosemary 
Cosh, Christine Zetti, Bonnie Duchene, 
Randy Stoneman. 

Back Row (Left to Right): Bob Wirch, 
John Voy, David Ruch, David Stewart, 
Daniel Kapetanov, Dennis Reaume, James 
Allan, Ken Sandelin, Tom Milner, Donald 
Peters, Paul Cooper, Cecil Southward, 
Brian Evans. 


Cecile Hardware and Electric 
A Complete Hardware Line 
Appliance Repairs 

Specialized Dryer and Stove Wiring — Free Estimates 

3623 Wyandotte St. 
Opp. Dominion Store 

WH 8-3671 Riverside 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

CHICKEN COURT 


ASSUMPTION UNIVERSITY 

OF WINDSOR 

confiratuUUes the 1961 gradunting classes of 

RIVERSIDE HIGH SCHOOL 

and welcomes your iiuiitiries about continuing 
your education in any of the following fields 

ARTS-PURE SCIENCE - BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
ENGINEERING - HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE - NURSING 

For Inforniation About Scholarships, Bursaries, Student Loans. Contact 

THE REGISTRAR, ASSUMPTION UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR 
400 HURON LINE CLearwater 4-9246 


Pajfe Eighteen 


































11A CLASS 

Mr. Medd is the head of our class; 

Catharine Hindmarsh is a winsome lass, 

Susan Taylor’s nickname is “STAR.” 

Richard Lefave’s pet peeve is a car. 

Joyce and Ellen (Russell) are twins, you can see, 

Our hockey player's name beg^ins with a “B.” 

Elizabeth (Barron), Michael (Loaring:) and Bruce 
(Davidson) have nicknames too. Lizzie, Dike and 
even Koo. 

In French class we get laughs for free 
Such as Albert (Lafleur) with his peanut tree. 

Or Mr. Cole (Roger Touchie) and the Silent One 
(Dave MacKay), 

With puns for Maya Van Diessen. 

Our expert in Physics might be James Hussey. 

But when it comes to Mental Health, just ask Marg. 
Brady. 


COLUMN 

Richard “The Rocket” and Cord, the goalie. 

Laugh at the nose of Peter Malowney. 

Larry rolls a bowlh»g ball. 

Ken and Gord play basketball. 

Nyla is a little doll. 

Here is a trio so merry- 

Robert and David (M) and juri. 

Blanche and Ron joke in geography, 

While Randy Austin read.s for Miss Clary. 

George is a friendly fellow. 

Walter's hair is red, not yellow. 

Bennet likes to argue, 

Neil—“comprenez-veus?” 

While David's pants go up in flames. Eric calmly 
draws aeroplanes. 

Diane is often going away—Now there's nothing left 
for me to say. 

Lynne Rozich 


11B CLASS 

Many have read the childhood stories of Peter Pan 
and the Knights of the Square Table. But the real 
story has fallen on but a few priviledged ears. The 
tale of Ever-Ever Land takes placi in IIB just be¬ 
yond the Twilight Zone. 

.\t the portals of our dear land we are greeted by 
Miss Darlene Dix and Suzanne Heartburn, The noisy 
silence is broken the moment ‘CurlcyLocks* Hughes 
enters. Immediately Peter Flying Pan, alias Wayne 
Harris, is awakened and begins to work on the agenda 
for the day. He is attracted for a moment as our 
Strawberry Blond, Carol Cowley oscillates by. At 
the Lost Girl’s home Peter is planning to teach the 
new boys to fly. .Anne in Wonderland and Barbara, 
the White Rabbit, arrive late as usual and Barb jumps 
as the alarm on lier clock goes off. At that moment 
enters the Queen of Hearts. Sheila Wonsch. Peter 
warns them all to concentrate; and by means of 
telekites they are soon drifting above the Devil's 
Islands and the home of Captain Hook Morrissey. 

He almost drops the China Doll, Rhoda. as he runs 
to the alarm system It is his latest invention. Gail 
Lewis, when tickled may be heard all over the cove 
and thus acts as a Dew Line. This causes Elliot Press 
Pickering to appear on the Scene with his chopper 
chasing |udv, ^lac the ‘Steele’ Knife awav. 

Off we fly again no strings attached. Above the 
quiet clamour, the gentle scream of tiny bells is 
heard as Tinkerbell Davison drags Linda ‘Charlie 


COMPLIMENTS of 10C 
and 

THE ATOM SPLITTER 


COLUMN 

Brown’ away. Into the blue we .sail, and at the fourth 
star (Elaine Gilbert in Disguise) wo turn left. As we 
fly over the forest, we see Little Red Hood Ken Wil¬ 
son still lost in his own private world; above his 
head we see Carol ‘Sheena* Payne .swinging through 
the trees. Further on we spot Sir Landside Logan on 
a gleaming black work-horse passing by the castle 
of Sleeping Beauty, Jennie Lynne Ford. Just as wc 
leave the island we see *Mad Hatter’ Vollans scurry¬ 
ing about to and fro like a herd of wild mices. 

By late afternoon we reach the land of Nod. Our 
Tiger Lilly (»ail (iraham, is feeling the effects of the 
day and sits down to comfort Jackie Davis who has 
lost Jill. Not everyone is tired, for Alarg Wiseman is 
having a Highland Fling; Marg Hodut, our Mine, 
de Paris is busy teaching the art of being a woman 
to some attentive listeners. The day is almost com¬ 
plete as Fly Boy, Peter Frying Pan. heads back home. 
With our last glimpse at Ever-Ever Land we see 
Marion, clogs and all. chasing an Indian spook. 

Our Drummer Boy, Rick, plays taps. Nancy our 
favourite (»irl Toy is nestled off into the land of 
dreams and now Michael is the only one left, and 
soon he is sawing logs just like Paul Bunyan. .At last 
Aliss Westgate can breathe again as she clo.ses the 
pages of the Fractured Fairy Tales she has read to 
us. All is well, till tomorrow! 

Sleep Tight, and Son jo doro 

Santa’s little helpers. 


WAFFLE’S ELECTRIC LIMITED 

ELECTRIC MOTORS 

400 Erie Street East 

Windsor, Ontario CL 4-2595 


Page Nineteen 

















CADETS—R.C.S.C.C. ADMIRAL HOSE 


RIFLE TEAM 


\ \ J 



Front Row (Left to RiQ»tt>! John Maxwel). Soyne Wiseman^ Edward PicHerlng, JuN Kasemets, Larry Relf, 
Gary Snyder, Peter Saxter, Ken Wlfson. 


Back Row (Left to Right): Rlek Faulkner, George Lewis, Dave Stewart, Mike Hunter, Peter Drury* Jim 
Shephard* Don Grant, Ian Nleml, Rod Brown, Paul Peacev- 


Pajje Twenty 





11C CLASS COLUMN 


11D CLASS COLUMN 


It is Friday morning, and the 8:45 hell is just ring¬ 
ing. We see Mr. O’Gorman opening Room 13, fol¬ 
lowed by Maxine W. and Dave .\scott. He is finally 
able to open the door after knocking over somebody’s 
pile of books. Cheryl and Ken T. "go and sit in fhe 
last two seats and quietly do their homework. Jacob 
enters, puts his books on the desk and goes over to 
chat with Ricky and John. Suddenly, a fiendish gleam 
is seen in Alan’s eyes. He carefully takes Jacob’s 
books and tries to balance them on the edge of the 
desk. Oops! Too bad, Jacob. Christine and Dave seem 
to be having a good time. 

At the blackboard, Doug, Dave, and Dwayne are 
rubbing off the basketball notices and are proceeding 
to glorify the hockey team, 

.'Man, Brent, and Dick are grinning at something 
on the bulletin board. 1 believe Mr. O’Gurman is 
interested too. He hurries to the back of the room to 
confiscate the jokes, that Brent has posted, much 
to the dismay of the others who haven’t seen them. 

The room immediately seems to be “quiet” until 
Bev and Sally enter. We know immediately that the 
voice yelling to Ron belongs to Bev. 

Sitting quietly at her desk is Marianne “the ‘man¬ 
ager* of the basketball team” Langlois, recording 
all the goofs that the girls made at the last game. 
Bonnie and Sandra are talking confidentially about 
their boyfriends, Barry and Ron. 

Sharon hops over Ricky’s desk (lie’s not in it) to 
talk with Vera about their J..\. meeting. 

Poor Larry seems to be sad. He is complaining to 
Nancy about Mr. ©’German’s insistance that he 
sjiould be able to talk French because of that good 
French name. Larry simply cannot convince his that 
he can’t, even with his good French accent. 

Margitta and John's discussion in German is heard, 
but not understood. 

Pat is talking with Dick again. My goodness! What 
did yem say, I an, to make Eleanor blush? By the 
wa}’, Carolyn, has your cat recovered from the oper¬ 
ation? Doug and Linda are having fun. 1 think Mr. 
(^’(tornian has had enough. He yells, “Doug, would 
you mind?” Doug smiles, looks at Linda, and answers, 
“No sir, I woudn’t mind.” 

At six minutes to nine Ken, oops, 1 mean Monica* 
comes in only to discover that she’s forgotten a book 
in her locker. ^ 

m 

\\ell, this is a typical morning in Room 13. 

Marianne Langlois 
Monica Menn 


FOR THE FINEST 
CORSAGES 

SEARY’S FLOWERS 

We Deliver 

1348 Ottawa St CL 3.3517 


Twenty one is nice to be 
But we are just nineteen; 

So meet the class of IID 
As we flash across the screen. 

Director, of com sc, is Mr. Giles, 

Who’s met with boo’s and cheers and smiles; 
The cast we’ll introduce one by one, 

So just sit !)ack and enjoy the fun. 

Janet M. our comedienne. 

Or “boneyard” as .she’s known; 

Barbara S. our blonde with bushy hair, 

We know she owns a comb. 

Tom Skinner also on the lot 
His fee is 5c for T.B. shots; 

Tom R. our l^arber of Seville 
Bill W, poor fellow, he’s been so ill. 

Jane-anne on knitting she is bent, 

The hat she made—wowie! Brent; 

Bob L. we can tell no lies, 

He’s always catching invisible flies. 

Tom Smith at paper drives, well he’s no lout 
He tears it up—some boy scout; 

Jane P. who doesn’t talk at all, 

But on the phone she has a ball. 

Larry M. who knows the rule, 

Early to bed, means early to school; 

Diane C.—Hey! what goes, 

Get those glasses off your nose. 

Clive T., alas much to our sorrow. 

Here today and gone tomorrow; 

Beverley S. the tiny little lass, 

Knows all the answers in “llappys” class. 

Lome R., “Come on you 
Stand right up and parlez-vous” 

Lynne B. in sports she’s really hot, 

She does her best which means a lot. 

Ted W. just before French classes, 

Very conveniently breaks his glasses; 

Sheila G., she's not dumb, 

She just sits back and enjoys the fun. 

You’ve met us all but we forgot, 

Montgomery and peanuts, our class mascots. 

Sheila Georges 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

9C 


Page Twenty-one 
















10B CLASS COLUMN 


10A CLASS COLUMN 

KNIGHTS OF THE CARD TABLE 

In ancient times of King Arthur, a number of 
knights sat around a Card table. They played cards, 
discussed rescued damsels and the art of Dragon 
killing. At this time all seemed well in the area of 
Camelot; however, King Arthur Duff fears war with 
the Coloured Castle. He summons the knights to con¬ 
ference around the Card table. They decide to attack 
the Coloured Castle before the Black Knights attack 
Camelot. Sir Kancclol Hoba leads the knights into 
battle the following morning. Sir Giles is over anxious 
and rides onto the drawbridge alone where he is 
quickly dropped into the moat. The Black Knight 
Clark says he and the Knights of Coloured Castle will 
meet them in combat. Sir Galahad Baxter fights 
Black Clark and they are seen heading for the wood.s. 
Sir Lancelot Hoba fights White Knight Ford and 
Red Knight Fauteaux and gains entry to the Coloured 
Castle. He frees the imprisoned and among them are 
his friends Judy Jones and Cathy Dell. Other Knights 
are entering the castle and scouring it for any hiding 
knights. Lancelot Hoba sees a handkerchief waved 
at him from the tower above him. He frees the im¬ 
prisoned damsels. Lady Sheeba Duncan and Princes.s 
Rumplestiltskins Booth. As they are leaving they 
meet the Black yueen Kelton and White Lady Brown 
and lock them in the tower. 

Back at Camelot, King Duff and yueen Andrews 
worry about the battle. A servant, Sandra Bain, en¬ 
ters and says the battle goes well. Does it? 

The Black Knight Clark has gained control of 
the drawbridge and has the attackers impri.soned. 
The Knights of the Card Table are doomed; Imt. listen 
a cry from the wall It is Robin Hood Holder and 
Little John Grossman. They slay the remaining 
Knights of Coloured Castle, find Lady Red Clen- 
denning, White Lady Brown and Queen Kelton and 
take them back to Camelot. Bolton & Burbridge ‘‘Have 
Horses Will Taxi Service’' take the prisoners back to 
Camelot. On the way they stop off at Bennett’s Town 
and at Burleigh’s Inn for refreshments and to change 
horses. In the stables the horses are changed by stable* 
maiden Kay. When they arrive at Camelot. they are 
cheered by Cleaner Hillman. Fi.x-it Johnston. Bake? 
Hipson. Grocer Shannon. Music-Director Ferry, 
Chart-Maker Kirk, Flag-Maker Campbell and Lamp- 
Lighter Hancox. Robin Hood Holder and Little John 
Oossman stay for dinner but arc chased back to 
Sherwood Forest by Lady Marion Flewelling. 

Camelot is again safe thanks to the Knights of the 
Card Table and the helpers from Sherwood. 

Faye Campbell. 



.According to my seers; this is what will happen 
in ten years: 

Corina Ocolisan—selling records (Corina. Corina). 
Reva Ried—selling H2II2 in a drug .store. 

Bev Smith—carrying an attendance slip. 

Sue Whitley—basketball instructor. 

Fran Tako—the world’s only scientist to nii.x chem¬ 
icals on horseback. 

Brenda Steele—cheerleading at O.xford. 

Bob Lindquist—bicycle repair man. 

Carol Solomchuk—Canadian Ambassador to Cuba. 
Bob Linton—making maps for the Oxford Atlas. 
Francis Munroe—teaching North Africans to do 
the “Pony.” 

Julie Brennan—High School teacher at Assump¬ 
tion; teaching boys 18 years and up. 

Judy Quarrington—helping Mrs. Speirs with her 
Rangers. 

Marilyn Madaby—teaching Latin. 

Lite Prcussel—Co-manager of the Riverside Re¬ 
gents with Ron V^idican as Manager. 

Theresa Sealey—selling Posturepedic Mattresses. 
Margaret Morrison — selling swim-suits to Eskimos. 
Larry Western—camel-spotter for the Canadian 
government. 

Ken Winch—can-can instructor for chorus girls. 
Lois Manney—advertising Spoolies for CKLW. 
Laura Stevenson—learning to stay ON a horse. 
Ellen Wood—volunteering an answer in any class. 
Jack Kitson—wdl liave his P.J. i)arty for the class. 
Jacciueline Spearin—talking in any class. 

Sue Livingstone—getting red as soon as she is 
asked a question. 

Walter Samann—working out his 100th problem. 
Phil Street—Einstein II. 

Tom Newmark—testing non-smear lipstick. 

Herb Miller—a pro-hockey player? 

Tom Millar—portraying Maynard G. Krebbs. 

Olga Sigmund—flirting with handsome boys. 
Nancy Watret—still standing in the hall with Wal¬ 
ter P, 

Jim Robinson—Billy Graham of R.H.S. 

Anne Powers 


D. W. JOLLY COMPANY LTD. 

OFFICE MACHINES 

CL 6-2603 103 Riverside Dr. W. 

ALL MAKES PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS 
Rentals — Portables - Standard 


Page Twenty-two 














IOC CLASS COLUMN 

IOC in 1%9: 

Ozzie Stahl—psychiatrist for K.H.S. teaching staff. 
Sandra Leggett—bird watcher for the R.C.A.F. 
Rick Moran—Rocket Richard of the year. 

Ruth Duncan—always an angel. 

Paul White—right hand man to Wayne. 

Wayne Long—left hand man to Paul. 

Ruby Thrasher—collecting Gold Bell Gift Stamps. 

Eric Seppala—building the Queen Elizabeth II as 
a hobby. 

Karen Johnson—still rushing home to see Huckle* 
berry Hound. 

Ken Moore— editing a new dictionary. 

Barb Day—^putting less toil in Lestoil. 

Dave Dent—principal of an all girls school. 

Susan Fuller—teaching the little Duffs how to 
blush. 

Bob Taylor—new Czar of Russia. 

John Loaring—lending his brain to Science for 
study. 

Iryne Maki—still trying to defy the laws of gravity. 
Robert Krivoshein—choir master at St. Aidants.* 
Jane Clancy—opeiating her own pencil sharpening 
service. 

Preston Smith—President of Blondes Inc. 

Harry Geldhop—making counterfeit pennies for 
bubble gum machines. 

Ron Young—public relations man for the U.S.S.R. 
Rob Richardson—selling pizza to the Italians. 
Sheila Wright—married to a millionaire. 

Henry Sipila—investigator for Pepsodent Co. to 
find out where the yellow went. 

(iraham Gould—a hood for M.G.M. 

Scott Wright—first person to be exiled to Mars. 
Irene Wojzuik—a future .scientist. 

Paul Walden—Christmas tree salesman. 

Kathy Kelly—taking guided tours around Europe. 
Boyne Wiseman—cracking nuts for Planters Pea¬ 
nut Co. 

Jo-Anne Gillespie—one of the nuts Boyne cracked. 
Mr. Byng—enjoying his retirement in Florida. 

by Jo-Anne Gillespie 


4 

> 

► 

This space donated by 10D 


QUALITY DIAMOND 
SWISS WATCHES ] 
FINE SILVER 

ENGLISH CHINA 

B I Px K S 

JEWELLERS 

Ouellette at Park 


10D CLASS COLUMN 

lOD has been known to be the worst class in the 
school, but the class itself has still plans for their 
future ambitions. They are as follows: 

David Ascott—a wet-water I)alhtub inspector. 

Sandy Baillie—to be a head-hunter in southern 
Africa riding a Dteroductyle. 

Brenda Cheetham—a head shrinker in Northern 
Canada. 

Cathy Crumi)—to be Lawrence Welk's bubble 
l)lower, 

Evelyn Debrecen—to teach French in Zooloo Zoo- 
loo land. 

Carol Fisher—a beach comber in the Northwest 
Territories, 

Dennis Gervais—to ride shotgun on a sheeny 
wagon. 

Gail Gratto—to marry a lawyer (G.H.) and have 
12 kids and have my mother baby sit. 

Jo-Anne Gratto—a philosopher to prove *Tf there 
is a will. There is a way.” 

David Higginbottom—to find out why I get a 
Charley horse every time I go to P.T. class. 

Monica Philps—to marry Biddy (in Great Expec¬ 
tations). 

Joy Stinchcombe—to be **Adanvs Tike.” 

Nancy Thompson—to hunt “Billygoats” in wes 
tern Canada. 

Bonnie Wells—to jiile up the z*s thinking of sV 

Ivileen Tiede—to have my alphabet start with “(V* 
((ford). 

Marg Tofflemire—to marry a millionaire from Long 
Island. 

Ron Unger —press the button that will send a 
missle to hit Russia 

John \\*oodhouse—to ride shotgun on a Phantom 
wagon and have Batman for a j>artner. 

Linda Westlake—to enter a pizza eating contest 
and win first prize. 

Gaye Webb—^Johnny’s girl. 

Barrie Warnock—to get a phvsinue like “I'arzan” 
of 1903. 

Sue .Ardiel—“To bt mellow.” 

Bob Baillie—First e.xplorer to the moon to see 
what makes “moonshine.” 

Robbie (loodfellow—to hope that in future year.s 
“Judy J.” gets to school before 8:43 a.m. 

Bob Simpson—to be Dick Trac\ *s a.ssistant and 
find out why little (Orphan Annie never grows a day 
older. 

Kay Wallace—to be able to wear a mohawk (no 
more hair problem). 

Marion Yates—to get .some sleep at “pajama par¬ 
ties” and “to be able to wash the dishes.” 

^ Miss Clary—to have a race with Mr. Byng and Mr. 
(uroux with their \ olkswagons. 

Janet Ireland—to be “Chubby Checker's” prancing 
pony. 

Sandy Long—to be “Annette’s Piuapple Princess.” 

Carol Lyon—to be “Fabian’s Tiger.” 

Paul Peacy—a Barnacle scrapper for H.M.C.S. 
Bonaventure. 

Bob Meloche—to marry into money. 

Linda Ovens—to sto]) fighting with Cathy. 

F’age Twenty-three 














OiCIM Hlxjk Sclioofy 

WHAT ? 


Drink Milk For Health 

The Milk Educational Council 

of 

Windsor and Essex Coniilv 


Thinking of a CAREER — or just a job? 

Like most smart students, you’ll want a lifetime career 
— not just a job at so much a week. And a career in 
banking could well be the an.wer to your plans for 
tlic future. Banking today offers a wider variety of 
interesting and better-paid positions than c\^er before. 
Consider it seriously before reaching your decision. 

And here are some of the attractions Canada's First 
Bank offers young graduates starting in banking . . . 
good increases regiuarly if you are good at your job 
... an effective training programme to prepare you 
for advancement,.. promotion based on merit — not 
seniority . . . pension and group insur- '•ijw nAMU' 
ance benefits .. • a genuine combination M j || 

of opportunity and security. 

If you are interested in finding out 
more about banking as a career, have a 1 1 M 111 
chat wiUi your nearest B of M manager. 

You'll find him most helpful. n.im 

Bank of Montreal 

Riverside Branch; 

GEORGE WIGLE, Manager 


Com pi I m enis o / 

Walker Insurance Agency Limited 

1942 Wyandotte Si. East 
Walkerville, Ontario 

GENERAL INSURANCE AGENTS 

Lome B. DeWolfe Reginald C. Bell Walter J. Blackburn 

President Vice-President Vice-Pres. Special Acets. 


Page Twenty-four 
































LITERARY 


THE SKIER 


Suddenly a man appeared im the rim of the cornice* He wiped the s%'ireat from his brow ami 
stooped to strap on his Aiistnan Alpine skis* He }ifanted his poles into the fluffy snow and gazed at 
the deep blue sky and then his eyes dropped to the floor of the valley three thousand feet below; his 
mind drank in the rapture of the country and he began to feel the prick of the cold air. All at once he 
boomed out a shout; the skiers on the floor of the valley turned their eyes skyward, searching for 
the man and when locating him stopped in amazement to marvel at the dauntless skier who was 
al>out to catapult down Devirs Leap. 

With a powerful shove on his alumininn (Miles he shot out ov^er the cornice and threaded his 
way into the new snow to his left* He needed this new snow* to act as a brake for soon he would 
have to skim along a narrow' path demanding great control and accuracy* He felt his skis bite tn; 
giving confidence and control to his movements* The wind, at first behind him, was wipping tears 
from his eyes. He cursed himself for forgetting snow goggles. Too late he saw the approach to the 
narrow path. Skidding precariously on the edge he forced his weight away from the chasm and after 
gaining his lialance headed for the hill which would hurl him in an arc one hundred feet off the 
ground to land below the pines* He tensed hitnsclf for the all-tmpurtant spring which would carry 
him to safely belotv the tree belt. At the precise moment his legs shot up like spring *steel and he was 
lifted into the deep bine air* Leaning forward to keep his body parallel to the ground lie caught sight 
of the crowd many hundred yeards below him* He exhilirated in casting off the bondage that binds 
humans to the earth but his flight was soon over* He hit the snow wnth a ‘Svhoosh” and sent clouds 
of it flying over his head. Every muscle ached from his exertion, his heart thumped violently, his 
lungs heaved, his bones groaned but be had been successful Briefly looking over his shoulder he saw 
his winding ski ttacks still etched in the siiow'. Only one more obstacle stood in his way before final 
victory* Below him some several hundred yards and to his left lay a corridor of packed snow' .some 
six hundred feet long* The corridor in the middle took a hairpin turn* One misjudgement and he 
would hit the boulders on either side at roughly seventy miles an hour* For at this point he reached 
the ai>ex of his speed. Andretialin pumped froni his glands fortified his muscles and keeiiecl his 
judgement. In a matter of seconds he hit the smooth snotv and Ms skis shot forward, gaining 
frightening spe^d on the ice* He struggled furiously to lean forward and for a brief moment he was 
out of control but he reached the correct stance and steeled himself for the hair pin turn. Bending 
his hips to the right the skis dug in; shotUing him along the low edge of the corridor and then he 
“shusshed*' left and then again right and he skimmed out onto the slowly sloping path leading him 
to the clubhouse and rest* 

With a twist of his legs he slopped, turned and gazed up to the cornice where lie had begun his 
journey some ten minutes ago* He felt warm fueling creep over him and he revellul in accomplish¬ 
ing the impossible—the traversing DeviPs Leap. 

Peter Loaring 12A 


L 


WINDSOR PUBLIC LIBRARY 


Page Twenty-five 



ilirtoria 

in the 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

Fuun/ied f/y Royal Charter in 18.16 "for the general education of youth 
in the various branches of Literature and Science on Christian Principles." 

As one of the Federated Colleges in the Faculty of Arts of the University 
of Toronto, Victoria College enrols students in all courses leading to the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Commerce and preparatory to 
admission to the schools of Graduate Studies, Divinity, Education. Law and 
Social Work. 

In Margaret Addison Hall and Annesley Hall accommodation is available 
for women students of Victoria College. In the Victoria College Residences 
ac(‘ommodatiou is available for men. 

Men and Women in Residence may be assisted 
through Residence Bursaries. 

For full information, including calendars and bulletins, 
apply to the Registrar Victoria College, Toronto. 


Best Wishes From The 

Riverside Piihlie Utilities 
Comiiiission 

[=3 ‘ * 

E. CECILE ..-. Chairman 

R. C. MOTT .. Commissioner 

GORDON R. STEWART. Q.C . xMayor 

D. D. MacKENZIE . Manager 

PAUL MAILLOUX Secretary-Treasurer 


Page Twenty-six 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

BERNHARDT’S FURNITURE LTD. 
“Where Modem and Tradition Meet” 
1645 Wyandotte St East 
Phone CL 4-7568 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
RIVERSIDE NURSERY 

Specializing in 

EVERGREEN - ORNAMENTAL TREES 
3510 Little River Rd. WHitehall 5-4946 





































OCIAL ACTIVITIE 


During the year many students enjoyed the Fri¬ 
day night dances sponsored by the Key Club and 
the Athletic Society. Particularly successful were the 
Initiation Dance, climaxing Initiation week, and the 
Hard Times Dance. 

The Student Council held a dance following the 
Commencement Exercises on December 21st, and a 
Record Hop featuring the disc jockey, Joe Vann, on 
March 24th. 

Snow scenes and the music of Phil Gimper.s Band 
provided the background for the Red Cross’s semi- 
formal at Christmas. 

The highlight of the year was the formal dance. A 
“g)psy’' theme prevailed at the thirteenth annual 
Maytime Rhapsody. The decorations consisted of 
coloured murals and streamers, a covered wagon and 
a large crystal ball, which hung from the centre or 
the ceiling. Due credit was extended to the dance 
committee. Peggy Varah, Mary MacPher.son. and 
Dorothy Humphric.s. 

The patrons for this social event were Mr. Walton, 
the teaching staff, and members of the Riverside 
Hoard of Hducation. 

Peggy Varah, lovely in a pale yellow brocaded 
gown, escorted by Emil Talacko, was presented with 
a bouquet of red roses and crowned “Queen of the 
Maytime Rhapsody Ball.’’ The princesses were, Msfry- 
Lou Sherman, charming in ja white-tiered cotton 
dress, accented by green polka-dots, accompanied by 
Hill White; Willa Force, stunning in white chiffon, 
and escorted by Ron Dickson. Mary-Ellen Loaring, 
exquisite in white nylon, and accented by small blue 
flowers with Fraser Fellows; Virginia Kidd, lovely 


in pink and white chiffon, accompanied by Bill Ursu; 
Judy Wachna, attractive in navy blue and white taf¬ 
feta, with Dave Klcombe; Mary MaePherson, pretty 
in pink and white chifion, escorted by Gary Robinson; 
and Pat Thompson, stunning in a blue and white lace 
gown, with Ron Clark. 

Noted dancing were Beverly .\levvick with Doug 
Steel, Beth Washington escorted by Ralph Gault, 
Pam Fellows and Glenn Campbell. Linda Bennet with 
Doug Butcher, Marian Ritchie escorted by Kieth 
Ward, Carroll Graham and Victor Vigneux. Liz Ka- 
vannaugh with Paul Carr, Gloria Brown escorted by 
Harr\^ Woodend, Donna Barton with Dennis Burling, 
Camille Watson and John Cleaver, and Lynda Emer¬ 
son escorted by Bob Issell. 

Still others enjoying the festivities were Frieda 
Fcrber and Anton Hubert. Sheila Georges and Barry 
Kenshol, Carol Payne with Bryan Rodie, Margaret 
Wiseman and Scott Mclntire, Gwen Burkhart with 
John Maxwell. Mary Martin with Randy Brown, Pat 
Berthiaume and Bill Fox, Lynne Roden and Jim Shan¬ 
non, Hetty Thomas with David Parmeter, (Mory Mil¬ 
ner with Jim Richter, Sandy He])luirn with Ken 
Lucicr, Barbara Yates and Dennis McCrae, Jane Anne 
Bower and Bill Moore, Linda X'ollens and Dave 
Baker, Jane Tebbs with Peter Wakefield, Colleen 
Howard with Paul Moores, Ruth Harrison and Roger 
Mousseau, Bev Wirch and Karl Ilk, Nina White and 
Gary Richardson, L^orothy Humphries with Wayne 
Norhraten, and many, many other.s. 

All year long, the students attended and enjoye<l 
the social events at the school. 

Judy Kersey, Colleen Howard. Linda Vollans 


Page Twenty-seven 



SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Metropolitan General Hospital 

WINDSOR, ONTARIO 

Th« of NursiJngr Metropolitan Generai Hoepftal, offers 

to qualified ftlgh school graduatea a three year courae leading 
to ellffibillty to write the Ontario Ngre® Regletratlon Exam- 
Inationa. This Is one of the moat prooreealve nursing schools 
In Ontario offering the newer program of education that Is 
gradually being adopted by foremost schools In the province. 

PATTERN OF COURSE 

Two years nursing education (including education exper* 
lence In both class room and hospital wards) followed by 
one year nursing Internship. An allowance of $l30.i00 per 
month Is given In the third year, 

FEATURES OF COURSE 
No tuition fee. Books supplied by school. 

Residence accommodation in modern school building with 
excellent living and teaching facilities. 

Well qualified teaching staff. 

Experience In all major branches of nursing. 

Opportunity for specialized experience In third year In 
Operating Room, Maternity, or ChMdfen^s Nursing. 

See School announcement re admission requirements. 

Information may be secured from: 

Director, School of Nursing 
2240 Kildare Road, Windsor 
Telephone CL 4-1855 


BEST WISHES 

^ourun 

Clothier to Gentlemen 

316 Peiissier CL 6-0808 



Best Wishes To 


1961 R.H.S. Graduates 


THE FIRST CANADIAN KEY CLUB 


RIVERSIDE KEY CLUB 


Page Twenty-eight 















ATHLETIC SOCIETY 





A. 




Front Row (Left to Right): Susan Clifford, Gerri Day, Bob Luck-Baker, Bill White, Sally Gelling, Mike 
Ward, Barb Howie, Shirley Slusarchuk, Barb Smith. Sheila Wright, Peggy Haley. 

Centre Row (Left to Right): Miss Barr, Blaire Durbin, Bev Martin. Marianne Langlols. Marg Tofflcmirc, 
Ann Powers. Diane Weber, Edith Miller, Elaine Gilbert. Marcia Brown. Elizabeth Baron, Judy Steel, 
Carol Hancox, Parti Fellows. Sue Taylor, Lynn Burnie, Faye CampbelL Dave Baker, Dave Dent, Ted 
Williams, Jack Kitson, Bob Hornsey, Mr. Giroux. 


Back Row (Left to Right): Barry Jones, Wayne Harris. 
Ruch, Ron Allan, Dennis Duff, Pete Syring, Scott 
Stott, Doug Topllffe, Al Rothwell, Dennis Ford. 


Bob Simpson, Gary Ambrose, Gary Huckle, Dave 
Meintire, Al Strachan, Richard LeFave, Bruce 


CHEER LEADERS 



Standing (Left to 
Right): Barbara Smith, 
Co-Captain, Karen Ar- 
diel. Captain. 

Kneeling (Left to 
Right); Mary Martin, 
Sally Gelling, Brenda 
Steel, Marion Yates. 
Jane Johnston, Janet 
Davidson. 


Page Tweiuy-niue 

























Page Thirty 





Page Thirty-one 
















Com plinientB of 

GLIDDEN DAIRY BAR 

1459 Wyandotte St. Riverside 

n'ith the very best to 
the bO-61 Grads 


SHIRLEY 


A MESSAGE FROM THE PRINCIPAL 

Employers agree that the persoii who is 
well trained, coiiretous and well groomed has 
the best chances for success. 

We urge you to stay in school and continue 
yon studies until you graduate. 

.After graduation, come to BULMER’S for 
specialized business training. 

Mrs. G. P. Mathoney 
BULMER BUSINESS COLLEGE 
44 University Ave., West 
CL 3-8202 


ART 


Sales 

AUTOMATtC GAS & OIL HEATING a 
Sheet Metal Work 

Ja Ee Murphy Sheet Metal Co. Ltd. 

Est'd 1921 

595 Tecumseh Rd- E*, Windsor, Orrtano 
CL 2-5781 WH 8-0432 


A. G. McIntosh 

TEXACO SEBVICE GABAGE 
Wyandotte & Thompson Blvd* 

WH S-1312 — Riverside, Ont. 


NON CONFORMITY 

A k^af falls away from the tree 
And floats dtnvn, caressed by the lender wiikK 
Alone and itni)ortanLin its (juest for ncmcunformity. 
Fur a few precious inonients. it is ntiirjue: 

Then a sudden gust of wiiid tosses it about 
Like a small boat in a swirling ntaeJstroin : 

But iLjs alone in ibe world, the only one of its kind. 
Until it lands and becomes one ol a niilllon. 

All identieak 

—Alan Strachan, Grade 12A 


Page Thirty-two 


































SENIOR FOOTBALL 



Front Row (Left to 
Right): Dennis Duff. Os¬ 
wald (Oz 2 le) Stahl, Dave 
Connor. Bruce Stott. 
Wayne Harris, Dick 
OXallaghan (Captain). 
Mike Ward, Doug Top- 
llffe, Tom Smith, Bob 
Luck. Baker, Peter Ma- 
lowney. 

Centre Row (Left to 
Right): Mr. Giroux 

(Coach), Bennet Orm. 
seth. Bill White. Mike 
Hoba, Rodger Touchie, 
Dave White, Rod Brown, 
Bob Lynch, Wayne 
Long, Pete Budwin. Mr. 
Sabo (Coach. 

Rear Row (Left to 
Right): Doug Connor 
(Man.), Al Strachan. 
Don Kincaid. Lyall 
Hughes. Gord Wirch, 
Pete Syring, Jim Robin¬ 
son. Bryan Rodle. Jim 
Duck. Virgil Duff (Man). 


MIDGET BASKETBALL 


Sitting (Left to 
Right): Mike Hunter. 
Danny MacPherson, 
Denny Courrier, Rob 
Hornsey. Jay Jones. 

Standing (Left to 
Right): John Voy. Elliot 
i-yons. Brian Barker, 
Peter McCailum, Don 
D»‘ant. Dick OXallag- 
han (coach). Ken San- 
delin, Chris Emmott, 
Huckle. Roger 
^aus. Chris Steed. 



Page Thirty-three 















Southern Conference Champions 

SENIOR BOYS' BASKETBALL 



Front Row (Left to 
Right): Harry Woodend, 
Ron Allan, Dick O’CaU 
laghan (Capt.), Mike 
Ward, Brent Manor. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right): Mr. Giroux 

(Coach)r Paul Klefaber, 
Bob Luck-Baker, Bill 
Voy, Oswald Stahl, Rod¬ 
ger Touchle, Jim Storey, 
Al Strachan (Manager). 


JUNIOR BOYS' BASKETBALL 


Front Row (Left to 
Right): Bob Linton. 

Gord Wirch (Captain), 
Jack KItson, Tom Haw- 
kina, Virgil Duff. 

Standing Row (Left to 
Right): Mr. Mascaro 

(Coach), Ken Woodall, 
John Maxwell. Doug 
Connors, Jurl Kasemets, 
Tom Smith (Manager), 
Mr. Giroux (Coach). 



Page Thirty-four 










track and field 



1st Row Seated (Left 
to Rights: Peter Loar- 
mg, Alex Davidson. Dick 
O'Callaghan. Peter Sy- 
rlng. Bill White. Bruce 
Stott, Gordon Thomp* 
son. Herb Miller. Mike 
Ward. David Logan. 


to Right): Carol Cow> 
ev, Audrey Hillman, 
Linda Westlake. Sue 
Whitley, Carol Harvey. 
Ann Powers, Ingred 
Stahl, Shirley Slusar* 
chuk. Pam Fellows. 
Lynn Burnie, Sue Tay* 
lor, Marlon Yates, Bar- 
bara Howie. Janet Da* 
vidson. 


1st Row Standing 
(Left to Right): George 
Lewis, Scott McIntyre. 
Dennis Duff. Jane John* 
ston, Barbara Smith. 
Evelyn Debrecen, Gale 
Purdy, Wendy Bur* 
bridge, Joyce Bolton. 
Olga Sigmund. John 
Loaring. Tom Smith. 
Bob Lynch. 


Back Row Standing 
(Left to Right): Brian 
Rodie, Charles Giles. Ted 
Williams. David White. 
Richard Lefave, Roger 
Touchie, Brent Manor, 
John Maxwell, Ken 
Woodall. Paul White. 
Doug Topliffe. 


HOCKEY TEAM 


Front Row (Left to 
Bight); Pete Loaring. 
Rick Moran. Dave Con* 
nor. Dill White. Dwayne 
Duke, Cave Dent, Bruce 
Stott. Bob Goodfellow. 
Al Rothwcll. 

Back Row (Loft to 
R«gHt): Berry Jones. 

Bob "Whity" Arnold. Al 
Davidson. Boyne Wise- 
»nan, Dave Long. Her* 
Miller. G o r d 
Thompson. Dave "Rab¬ 
bit" Baker. Gary Am* 
hrose, Bobby Gratto. 

Standing; Mr. Wilkin* 
ton. 



Page Thirty-five; 























BOWLING CLUB 



Seated ( L & f t t © 
Right); Bill White, 
Peter Syring, Brian 
Rodie, Mr. Wilkinson, 
Al Strachan* 

let Row Standing 
(Lett to Right)* Bob 
Arnold, Wayne Norbra- 
ten, Doug Connor, Peter 
Wakefield, Paul Carr, 
Scott Meintire, Ken 
King. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right): Dennis Kosles^ 
cu, Dwayne Duke, Dave 
Connor, Randy Brown, 
Boh Lynch, Paul Hewitt,, 
Jim Storey, Tom Ryan* 
Bill Voy, Ross Miles. 


THE BADMINTON CLUB 


Front Row (Left to 
Right)! Margitta Wiede¬ 
mann, Sue Taylor* Pam 
Fellows* Shirley Slusar- 
cHuk. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right): Jack Kitaon, 

John Maxwell, Monica 
Mcnn, Jane Wachna, 
Blaire Durham, Susan 
Downey, Sandra Miller* 
George Lewis* Miss 
Barr* 



i 


1 1 / 










u 


Page Thirty-six 
























JUNIOR FOOTBALL 


Front (Left to Right): 
Barrie Warnock, Gary 
Ambrose. Jack Kitson. 
Mike Hoba. Denny 
Courier, Oswald Stahl. 
Bob Simpson. Ken 
Winch. Jim ‘‘Deacon** 
Robinson. 

Centre (Left to Right): 
Ron Young. Charles 
Giles. Roddie Brown. 
Peter Perkins, Roger 
Maus. (Standing) Mr. 
Mascaro. Doug Topliffe. 

Back (Left to Right): 
Doug Connor. Chris De> 
Wolf. Jay Jones. Tom 
Miller. 



PREFECTS 



Seated (Left to Right): 
Elizabeth Day, Gwen 
Burkhart. Colleen 
Howard. Jane Wachna. 
Carol Hancox. Pat 
Berthiaume. Dick (O’. 
Catig) O’Callaghan. Gary 
Robinson. Larry Relf. 
Lynda Emerson. Mary 
MacPherson. 

Middle (Left to 
Right): Mr. Byng, Mr, 
O’Qorman, Mies Barr. 
Roddy Brown. Ron 
Waddington, Craig AL 
len, Sharon Parmeter. 
Janice Moore. Shirley 
Slusarchuk. Sandra Le- 
ver. Judy Jansen, Betty 
Landauer. Beth Wash, 
ington, Ingrid Stahl. 
Pam Fellows. Blaire 
Durbin. David Baker. 
Brian Rodie. Blair Mor- 
rissey. 

Back (Left to Right): 
Pete Wakefield. Walter 
Pastorius. Dave Kelling. 
ton. Bennet Ormseth. 
Ron Allan. Ken King. 
Mike Ward. Robert 
Lynch, Juri Kasemets. 
Gary Snyder. Paul Carr, 
tcott McIntyre. John 
Maxwell. Ross Miles. 
Dave White. Bill 
Powers. David Tarda. 
Larry Ralph. 


Thirty-seven 






























Coinpliments of 

Kelsey Wheel Company 
Limited 

309 Ellis Avenue E. 

Windsor, Ontario 


ST. ROSE HARDWARE 
2403 Wyandotte St, Riverside 
WH 5.2334 

Branch Store 

EAST WINDSOR HARDWARE 
Wyandotte at Pillette — WH 5-6101 

“We Deliver"' 


IMPERIAL BANK OF CANADA 

(The Bank That Service Built) 
RIVERSIDE BRANCH 

Wyandotte L. A. BARRON 

A St. Louis Manager 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
BEAVER LUMBER CO. LTD. 

2304 Walker Road 
CL 4-9271 


COMPLIMENTS OP 

COPELAND’S BOOKSTORES LTD. 
5 STORES TO SERVE YOU 
485 PELISSIER ST. 

1569 TECUMSEH BLVD. E. 

2054 WYANDOTTE ST. W. 

1314 WYANDOTTE ST., RVSD. 
1292 LINCOLN AT OTTAWA 


HAWKESWOOD GARAGE LIMITED 

COMPLETE COLLISION SERVICE 
Phones; CL 4-1108 - CL 4-1109 
270 Erie St East at McDougall 
WINDSOR. ONT. 


DISGUISE 

I once read of a tat in a leopard skin. 

My pretty young man you remind me of him. 

You fit the dress well and saunter the like, 

But for honour and vanity, your still just a tyke. 

He paraded the iand in all his glory. 

Was not he sad it was only a story, 

Until he mocked that cat so thin- 

For twas a leopard in a cat skin. 

Sandra Millar 


LEO J. FERRARI. LG.A. 

Groceries, Meats, and Vegetables 
1236 Wyandotte Riverside, Ont. 


Page Thirty-eight 






















































BOYS' SPORTS 


1960-61 SEASON 


The varsity football team, ably coached by Mr. 
Girou.x and Mr. Sabo, included a backficid of Dick 
O'Callaffhan. Mike Ward. Brian Kodie, Bruce Stott, 
and quarterback Dave Connors. 'Phe line was made 
up of Wayne Harris, Doujf Topliffe, Bob Luck-Baker' 
Wayne Long and Tom Smith, with ends Bill White 
and Pete Maloney. 

Other nienihers who saw considerable action, both 
offensively and defensively, were Lyall Hughes, Scott 
McIntyre, Jim Duck, jack Kitson, Ozzie Stahl, Pete 
Syring, .A1 Strachan and Bob Lynch. 

Although, unfortunately, the team lost all their 
games this season, each loss was by a very minute 
margin. The majority of the members were in grade 
eleven, and so will be back next year to give us a 
most promising team for 1961-62. 

A junior team was organized by Mr. Mascaro, so 
that we may be assured of a well-trained group for 
future years. 


The Senior Boys Basketball team was most suc¬ 
cessful, also under the leadership of Mr. Giroux, and 
proceeded to win the Southern Conference W.O.S.S.A. 

-A championship. This team won five and lost one 
of their game.s. This loss necessitated a play-off 
which was won by a score of 41 to 36 over the second- 
place Essex team. Riverside then travelled to Tillson- 
burg to participate in the W.O.S.S.A. playdowns, 
losing the semi-finals to Sarnia but winning the Con¬ 
solation Championship by downing Wallacebnrg 


The team was composed of Harry Woodend, Mike 
Ward, Brent Manor, Dick O’Callaghan and Ron .Al¬ 
lan, with fine reserve strength from Roger Touchie. 
Bill Voy, Jim Storey, Ozzie Stahl, Bob Luck-Baker 
and Jerry Kasements. 

The Junior Boys Basketball team showed vast im¬ 
provement this year, with a line up of Doug Connors. 
Bob Linton, Jack Kitson, Tom llawken, Virgil Duff 
and Gordon Wirch. While the team only compiled 
one win for the season over the high-flying Essex 
Raiders, they show tremendous promise for next 
season. 


HOCKEY 

The members of this years’ team are Dave Baker, 
Boyne Wi.seman, Bill White. Gary Ambrose, Herb 
Miller, Bob Goodfellow, Gord Thompson, Dwayne 
Duke, Bruce Stott, Gary Huckic, Dave Connors, Dave 
Dent, Al Davidson, Boli Arnold, Bob C.rotto, and 
Barry Jones. 

The Hockey Team had a very successful year and 
came very close to winning the championship. Under 
the expert handling of Mr. Wilkinson, the team won 
nine and tied two of the sixteen games that they' 
played. The Riverside team jilaced second in the 
league standings. In the semi-playoffs they defeated 
Notre Dame hut lost to Catholic Central in the final 
playoffs. 

Dwayne Duke and Bruce Stott were the top scorers 
of the team and Bill White acquired more penalties 
than any' other team member. 


TRACK AND FIELD 

-At the Southern Conference held in Essex, the 
Riverside Rebels won the coveted championship. Of 
the Scnior.s, Bob Issel placed first in the 440 and the 
880. Harry Woodend acquired three firsts and Scott 
.Macintire placed first in the high jump, the hundred 
yard dash and the 220. Fraser Fellows won the discus 
and the shot put. The .Senior boys al.so placed first 
in the relay. 

In the intermediates, Ron Duncan placed third in 
the shot put; Roger Touchie won the 880; Mike Ward 
placed second in the discus; Dick O’Callaghan jilaced 
second in the javelein and the intermediate boys 
placed third in the relay. 


The Midget Basketball team was continued this 
.vear, with Dick O’Callaghan, Mike Ward ami Ron 
• Han as coaches. The grade-niners were taught the 
fundamentals at the first of the season, and later 
pitied considerable experience in competing in ex- 
b'bition games. 


In the junior boys’ division, Ken Woodal placed 
first in the 440, .second in the 220 and the hop-step- 
jump. Herb Miller placed first in the shot put and 
di.scus, Mike Loaring and (leorge Lewis placed se¬ 
cond and third in the junior boys pole vault. The 
juniors placed third in the relay event. 


Page Thirlv-niiie 


WOSSA and Southern Conference 


Champs 


SENIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Ist Row (Loft to 
Right): Shirley Slusar* 
chuk. Sheila Georges. 
Sue Taylor (Capt.), 
Elaine Gilbert, Gale 
Purdy. 

Second Row (Left to 
Right'): Peggy Upton 

(Official), Blaire Dur¬ 
bin (Official), Carol 
Burbridgo, Pam Fellows. 
Lynda Emerson. Carol 
Honcox, Ingrid Stahl. 
Sandra Hepburn, Miss 
Barr (Coach), Janice 
Moore (Official), Mar), 
anne Langlois (Man* 
ager). 




JUNIOR GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 


First Row (Left to 
Right): Susan Whitley. 
Anne Emerson, Lynn 
Burnie. Beth Purdy, 
Linda Westlake. 

Second Row (Left to 
Right): Peggy Upton 

(Official), Candy Ay- 
toun (Manager), Gail 
Hancox. Marilyn Mai* 
laby, Margaret Toffle* 
mire. Ann Powers. Olga 
Sigmund, Linda Moore, 
Janice Moore (Official), 
Miss Griffiths (Coach). 





paj^c I’orty 
















SENIOR GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL 



Firit Row (Left to 
Right): Carol Hancox 
<Capt.)» Pam Feltowe* 
Shirley Sluaarchuk, Su« 
san Taylor, Lynda 
Emerson. 

Second Row (Left to 
Right): Peggy Upton 
(Official), Carol Bur> 
bridge, Judy Steel, Mlea 
Barr (Coach), Marcia 
Brown. Barbara Howie, 
Nyia O'Connor, Janite 
Moore (Official), Pat 
Berthiaume (Official). 


JUNIOR GIRLS' VOLLEYBALL 


Front Row (Left to 
Right): Connie Larking. 
Nancy White. Lynn 
Burnie, Brenda Steel. 
Linda Westlake. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right); Peggy Upton, 
(Timers Jo-Ann Gilles¬ 
pie, Wendy Burbrtdge. 
Maya Van Desaen. Miss 
Oriffiths, Ann Davies. 
Bvelyn Debrecen. Janice 
Moore (scorer), Pat 
Berthiaume. 



Page Forty-one 









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Residential School for Girls 
Founded In 1876 


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For information and Prospectus 
please write 

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Page Forty-two 






















VOLLEYBALL 


GIRLS' SPORTS 


The Juniors lost their first jtanic to Leamington 
but came back to win the next three games. They 
entered the playoffs against Leamington hut were de¬ 
feated. Members of the team included VVendv Bur- 
bridge. Ann Davy. Lynn Burnie. Maya van Diessen. 
Jo Ann Gillespie, Connie Larking. Brenda Steel, Lin¬ 
da We.stlake, and Nancy White. 

The Senior \'olleyball team this year was led bv 

Captain Shirley Slu.sarchuk and coached by Miss 
Harr. Other team members included Pam Fellows, 

Blaire Durbin, Carol Hancox, Lynda Emerson, Carol 
Hurbridge, Nyla O’Connor, Barbara Howie, Judy 
Steel, Sue Taylor and Marcia Brown. 

.\lthough the team tried very hard, they managed 
only one victory against Essex. 

The interform volleyball championship was won by 
the 12.^ girls. 


BASKETBALL 

The members of the Junior team are as follows: 
Lynn Burnie, Sue Whitley, Beth Purdv, Anne Emer¬ 
son. Linda Westlake, Gail Hancox, Anne Powers. 
Linda Moore, Olga Sigmund. Marilyn Mallaby. and 
Marg-arei Tofflcmire. 

Of the six season games ])layed, the girls won two 
and lost four. The teams jilayed very well however, 
and should be congratulated on their effort. 

The Senior Basketball team, captained by Sue 'I'ay- 
lor, was second to none during the regular season. 
The team under their capable coach. .Miss Barr, was 
^Icfealed only once by Leaniiii|,^on. 

In the playoff game the girls were easy victors 
over the Leamington squad and .advanced to rtie 
.O.S.S..A. play downs in Tillsonburg. The Rebel 
Ifirls defeated Ingersoll in the semi-finals and were 
victorious over the Simcoe girls in the finals. 

Team members were Sue Taylor. Pam h'ellows, 
^hirley Slusarchuk, Lynda limerson. Gale Purdy. 
Sandy Hepburn, Carol Burbridge, Ivlayne Gilbert! 
ngrid Stahl. Carol Hancox, and Sheila Georges. 'Phe 
aian.iger of the team was Marian Langlois. 

Congratulations girls on your victories and for 
iriiiging the W .O.S.S..\. championship back to River¬ 
side. 


TRACK AND FIELD 

The Junior girl.s finished first in the meet. Olg, 
Sigmund placed thiid in the High Jump. Lvnn Bur¬ 
nie vvas first and Linda Westlake was second in the 
Standing Broad Jump. Lynn Burnie came in first in 

fourth was 

In the Shotput. Ann Powers was first and ICvelyn 

Debrecen was fourth. Ann set a new record for this 
event. 

Lynn Burnie was second in the 75 yard dash. In 
team events the Junior girls were first in the Basket- 
ball Pass aiuj second in the relav*. 

The Intermediate girls were first in the Basketball 

a'so placed second 
the relay Barbara Howie was second in the 75 

.P'aced second m the High 
Jump, third m the Standing Broad Jump and third 
m the Shotput. Sue Taylor placed first in the Shot- 
put and set a new record. 

The Senior Girls won the Baskethall Pa.ss liy edgiiv^ 

f^rV '^‘ 7ti Hetherington was 

first and Beth Lyon fourth in the High Jump Camille 

‘he Standing Broad lump. 
Mart Lou Sherman was second in the Running 

n ihl “"‘i and Jump. 

In the Shotput Linda Waugh was second and Helen 

Hetherington was fourth. Helen Hetherington set a 
new record in the 75 yard dash. 

Congratulations go to all the girls who participated 
in the sports activities and good luck next year. 

Carol Harvey 
Janice Moore 


CHEERLEADING 


Ihis year 19(iO-OI has been full of compeiuion ami 
right along with our fighting teams have been the 
cheerleaders. With black and gold pom-poms waving 
III the air they have promoted school spirit quite a 
hit this year. 


v't " 'T • -'laLV Martin. Marion 

Jw?’ vj-* J«h»-Mon. Janet Davidson. Brenda 
Steel, Susan .Vrdiel, co-captains Karen Ardeil am! 
Barbara Smith, substitute Beth .Montgomery. 

our favourite cheerleaders: Kristine Lavikka Bar¬ 
bara \ates and Sally Gelling. 

"f.y .'ear’s cheerleaders success and 
school spirit will continue to increase. Also we hope 
next yesjr s teams will be as victorious as this veaf’s 
teams were. 


Karen Ardiel 
Pagfe Forty-three 






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l*age Forty-four 






















































KEY CLUB 



Front Row (Left to 
Right): Rodger Touchle* 
Mike Ward* Dick 0*CaU 
laghan (Treaeurer). Ron 
Allan (Vlce-Prei.), Den¬ 
nis Duff (Pres.)* Ron 
Waddington ,( S e c . ) 
Blair Morrissey (Lt.- 
Gov.)* Tom Smith (Sgt.- 
at Arms), Doug Connor. 

Middle Row (Left to 
Right): Dave Mersh- 

back. Allan Rothwell. 
Roddic Smith, Harry 
Woodend* Oord Wirch, 
Bryan Rodie, Virgil 
Duff. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right): Jim Duck, Ben- 
net Ormseth. Paul Carr, 
Scott Meintire, Gary 
Robinson, Ross Mile*. 
Ken Winch, Jack Kit- 
son. 


I.S.C.F. 


Front Row (Left to 
Rights: Vice-Pres., 
Gwen Burkhart, Pres.* 
Dave Tarcia, Sec.- 
Treas.. Elizabeth Bar¬ 
ron. 

Middle Row (Left to 
Right): Sheila Wonsch, 
Linda Moore, Ann Ferry* 
Betty Landauer, Joan 
Orthner, Sheila Kelton, 
Dorothy Landauer, 
Aline Stannard. 

Back Row (Left to 
Bight): Philip Street, 
Nelson Orthner, Don 
Master. 




















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Page Forty-six 













































library club 


Seated (Left to 
Right): C^rol Solom- 
chuk, Judy Kersey Se« 
cretary^ Gwen Burk¬ 
hart President, Olga 
Sigmund. 

Standing (Left to 
Right): Jean Bruce, 

Lois Manney, Elizabeth 
Barron, Julie Brennan, 
Judy Jansen, Anne 
Powers, Mary Martin, 
Pat Berthiaume. 



JUNIOR RED CROSS 



Front Row (Left to 
Right): Joyce Russel, 
Elien Russel, Mrs. Pa- 
veska. Elizabeth Day, 
President, Margaret 
Brady, Vive-President. 

Back Row (Left to 
Right); Barbara Day, 
Aline Stannard. Susan 
Fuller, Ruth Duncan, 
Margaret Woodall, 
Diane Weber, Yvonne 
Shuker. 


Page Forty-seven 
















CLUB REPORT 


CADETS 


BADMINTON CLUB 


ATHLETIC SOCIETY 


R.C.S.C.C. Admiral Hose 

The corps, in its fifth year, has 
again won the Lord Strathcona 
Shield for General Efficiency 
among the High Schools of On¬ 
tario, but this time by only one 
|)oint. Although the rifle team 
did not win a Marksmanship 
Shield this year, in the 1961 
series of match targets, both 
teams are handing in some of the 
best averages the corps has yet 
seen. 

During the summer, VValt Pas- 
torius and Grant Smith took a 
week-long cruise through the 
Thousand Islands near Kingston 
on the brig “St, Lawrence IL“ 
Paul Peacey and Rick Faulkner 
l)oth took seven-week courses at 
II.M.C.S. Stadacona; Paul, in 
Radar Plotting; and Rick, in 
Gunnery. Gord Thompson and 
Lyall Hughes took seven-week 
Bandsman’s courses at H.M.- 
C.S. Acadia. A crew from 
.\dmiral Hose again won the 
whaler-sailing finals for Eastern 
Canada. Fourteen cadets out of 
twenty who tried passed the 
L/C exam this year. 

The annual inspection ran off 
(|uite smoothly in May. in the 
Recreation Centre. Besides the 
usual Military displays of Sig¬ 
nalling. Block-and-tackle, and 
Marching Manoeuvres, a gym- 
natics exhibition was given by 
Doug Fitzgerald, Christine La- 
vika, and three of the cadets. 

Many of the cadets who were 
with the corps when it first star¬ 
ted this year, left, and along with 
many new cadets two officers, 
Mr. Mascaro and Mr. Giroux, 
entered this year. At present the 
guard and band arc practising 
for the forth-coming annual in- 
.spection and, with enrollment uo 
to one hundred and ten, the 
corp’s future looks very good. 

John Maxwell 


The executive of the 1960-61 
Senior Bcidminton included: Pam 
Fellows, President; Sue Taylor. 
Secretary-Treasurer; Shirley 
Slusarchuk, Tournament Chair¬ 
man; and Margitta Wiedemann. 
Publicity Manager. 

The Senior Badminton in¬ 
cluded Grades 11, 12, and 13 
meeting every Monday night 
from 6:45 until 8:45. 

Since there was not much 
interest and participation in the 
club this year the Grade Tens 
were allowed to join in February. 

In January the Badminton 
Club held its tirst Tcachers-Stu- 
dents Badminton Tournament. 
Teachers participating in the 
tournament were Mr. Byng and 
.Mr. Winterton. 


On behalf of the Senior Bad¬ 
minton Club, 1 would like to 
express our thanks to Miss Barr 
for her guidance and interest in 

the Club. - _ , 

Sue Taylor 


THE PREFECTS 

A new system of jirefects has 
made its first appearance in 
Riverside High School this year. 
Basically, the Prefect system’s 
purpose is to aid the teachers in 
keeping order in hallways and 
classrooms. The founders and 
supporters of the system are the 
teachers Mr. O’Gorman, Miss 
Barr and Mr. Byng. The arm- 
bands for the Prefects were fur¬ 
nished by the Student Council 
Captains for the teams, one for 
each week day, are: Ric¬ 

hard O’Callaghan, Robert Relf. 
Carol llancox, Gary Robinson, 
and Patricia Berthiaume. The 
Prefects are chosen from among 
the students of grade eleven, 
twelve and thirteen, and perform 
various duties of supervision in 
the lunchrooms and hallways be¬ 
fore nine o’clock and before one 
o’clock. 

The whole Prefect system is a 
form of experiment, and it is 
hoped that it will be successful. 

Gary Snyder 


The .Athletic Society this year 
has had many undertakings. For 
those interested in skating, a 
special Skating Club has been 
organized. Members are allowed 
to skate at the <;rena every Tues¬ 
day at noon. The extra sports 
e(|uipment in the gym was de¬ 
signed for the students’ use at 
noon and after .school. 'Fhe Soci¬ 
ety has also contributed to the 
purchase of the basketball uni¬ 
forms for the boys, and has pur¬ 
chased the uniforms for the hoc¬ 
key team. 

The executive of the Athletic 
Society this year is as follows: 
President. Mike Ward; Vice-Pre¬ 
sident, Sally (^jelling: Secretary. 
Barb Howie; Treasurer, Boh 
Luck-Baker ; Publicity Chairman. 
Shirley Slusarchuck. 

Barb Howie 

RED CROSS 

Thus far, the Junior Red Cross 
has had a very successful and 
prosperous year. The enrolment 
is much larger than the previous 
year and we hope it continues to 
grow. 

Over two hundred students 
and teachers attended the sixth 
annual “Snowflake Swirl,” danc¬ 
ing to music by Phil dimple’s 
Band. We were very pleased with 
its result and profit. VV’^e are now 
waiting for information as to 
where this money should be .sent. 

.At the beginning of the year, 
school ribbons were sold for lOc 
each and once again are on sale. 
Health Kits are being completed 
and will be sent to Toronto Hcad- 
cjuarters, and in turn to many 
needy people of the world. 

This year’s e.xecutive included: 
lUizabeth Day, President; Mar¬ 
garet Brady, Vice-President; El¬ 
len Russell, Secretary; Joyce 
Russell. Treasurer. 

We wish to thank Mr. Walton 
and Mrs. Paveska for their help 
and co-operation during the pa.st 
year. 

Ellen Russell 


Page Forty-eight 



BOWLING CLUB 

Karly in January a senior hoys’ 
howlinjr club was or^^anized. 
largely through the efforts of Hill 
\\ hite. At the first meeting the 
captains: Pete Syring. Allan 
wStrachan, Mr. Wilkinson and P>ill 
\\ hite were chosen along with 
the executive: IVte Syring, 
Treasurer, and Bryan Rodie. 
Secretary. Four temporary teams 
were set up and after two weeks 
four permanent teams started the 
regular schedule. Awards were 
given for the best team, high 
single and higii triple. 

Bryan Rodie 

I.S.C.F. 

Kvery Wednesday noon in 
Room 12 the Inter-School-Chris- 
tian-P"ellowship group met to ful¬ 
fil their motto, “To know Christ 
and to make Him known.” This 
year the day of the meeting was 
changed from Thursday to 
Wednesday as it was felt more 
students would be able to attend 
under the joint leadership of Mrs. 
K. Steeves and Mr. Keith Laps- 
ley. The group met regularly for 
Bible studies, discussions, sing¬ 
ing and to hear speakers. 

As guest speakers, we have 
been privileged to hear: Mrs. 
Ralph Greenhovv, Mr. George 
Funi, Rep.^ Norman Street and 
Mrs. Lois Thompson. This year, 
too, saw Hernie Smith become the 
urea staff member. J^ernie is 
most welcome in this area and* 
ha.s already sparked I.S.C.F. ac¬ 
tivities. He is a graduate of Kent 
Lniversity in Ohio and has 
Worked in the Northern Ontario 
region. 

Ihis year, the group’s Presi¬ 
dent was David Tarcia, \*ice-Pre- 
sident, Gwen Burkhart and Se¬ 
cretary, lilizabeth Barron. Under 
their leadership we had manv in¬ 
teresting meetings, along with a 
Hard Times Party and a city- 
'vide Bowling Party. 

Much thanks goes to Mi.ss 
Dottier for letting us u.se her 
and to our sponsors for 
their hard work. 

Betty Landauer 


KEY CLUB COLUMN 

The Key Club took on several 
major projects this year and 
numerous minor ones. 

Blair Morrissey was elected to 
the position of Lieutenant-Gov¬ 
ernor of our division last spring 
and his assistance to the club 
proved invaluav’le. It was our 
hoi)e that Blair would be able to 
lend his many talents to the posi¬ 
tion of District Governor this 
year but unfortunately Blair is 
leaving us this summer for Mon¬ 
treal. 

Scott Me Intire is to he con¬ 
gratulated for his service to the 
school in conceiving and con¬ 
structing the new .sound system 
which has proved so useful in the 
gymnasium. 

1 he Key Club conducted the 
Municipal IClection ”Ge Out and 
Mote” Camj)aign again this year. 
Princess Anne, the winning ele¬ 
mentary school, received $50.00 
for their efforts to add to their 
student facilities. 

1 he school library was pre¬ 
sented with several books by 
Canadian authors, which it is 
hoped will prove of lasting in¬ 
terest. 

As the Rebelogue is going to 
press, we are planning a special 
project for the annual Oiitario- 
guebec-Maritimes District Con¬ 
vention ii/Petcrborough: a birth- 
day celebration of Canadian Key 
Clubbing. The Riverside Club 
was the first in Canada, esta¬ 
blished fifteen years ago in 1946. 
W'e have tried to make it our res¬ 
ponsibility to live up to the repu¬ 
tation of leadership and service 
that has been part of the River¬ 
side Key Club. 

Ron Waddington, 12A 


RIFLE TEAM 


With the annual addition of 
cadets to the corps, came an ad¬ 
dition to the rifle team. The new 
members this year show a re¬ 
markable aptitude, and the Range 
Officer, Mr. Busby, is quite 
pleased with their 'attitude. In 
his opinion the team next year 
will give forth still better' re¬ 
sults. 


As for matches, the team this 
3 car did (juite well. No returns 
are^ as yet available from the 
D.C.R.A. match targets, but our 
average has improved. At the 
Windsor Junior Rifle Meet the 
team placed fourth, with a 561 
out of a possible 600. Rick Faulk¬ 
ner, Chief Petty Officer, scored 
a 99 in a three-way tie for the 
highest .score in the match. 

Quite a beneficial aid to the 
team was the purchase this year, 
by the Riverside Board of Edu¬ 
cation, of eight shooting jackets. 
Mr. Busby hopes for more in the 
future. 


All in all the team this year has 
l»een very successful in its en¬ 


deavours and we all 
the instruction of Mr. 
the support of school 
board. 


appreciate 
Busby and 
and school 

Don Grant 


LIBRARY COLUMN 

The Library Club held the elec¬ 
tion for a new executive at its 
first meeting of the year in Sep¬ 
tember. The girls elected were: 
president, Gwen Burkhart; and 
vSecretary, Judy Kersey. 

At one of our meetings. Mrs. 
Dingman of Carnegie Library 
spoke to the club and showed a 
film illustrating the work of a 
librarian. We also had a film at 
our last meeting before the Eas¬ 
ter vacation. 

The girls in the Library Club 
work at the desk at noon and 
after school. As a reward for their 
work, they have an annual out¬ 
ing financed by the library fines. 
This year, we went to a \'ery en^* 
joyable performance put on by 
the Canadian National Ballet at 
Cleary Auditorium. 

At the end of the .school vear. 
there were about three hundred 
books on the Library shelves. 

I he Key CUib verv generouslv 
donated several new books by 
Canadian authors. 

Gwen Burkhart 


Page Forty-nine 







BEST WISHES TO THE 
CLASS OF ’61 

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CLASS COLUMN 9A 

9A woulciirt he the same if 

Pam didn’t hlush every time 
John’s name is mentioned 

Mary Smith didn’t like pizzas 

Klizaheth ever spoke up in class 

Kdith didn’t hold the torch for 
the While hoys 

Nan didn’t like motorcycle rides 

Mary llolod didn’t love horses as 
she does 

Dorothy didn’t have such jet- 
hlack hair 

Calhv ever her feet out of 
hallet shoes 

Nancy wasn’t looking for a clean¬ 
shaven male 

Janet I'eacy and J.C. didn’t make 
hig news each week-end 

Sandy weren’t so attracted to 
Tom Skinner’s red hair 

Heather ever pinned her heart on 
one hoy 

Janet didn’t want to join the ca¬ 
dets 


Lynne didn’t like the rumours 
about her and another party? 
(Jim) 

Marg didn’t have such a crush on 
our handsome scientist 

Heth didn’t have such Tall ideas 
ahoul haskelhall 

Denny’s feet ever touched the 
floor in the class rooms 

Candy ever played haskethall as 
well as she manages 

Kllen ever got Jim Shepherd in 
the cloakroom alone 

Anne K. didn’t flirt so much with 
the male sex 

Brian, our choir angel, didn’t 
write themes in his hlack hook 

Rod didn’t get comjdaints in (»eo- 
graphy class about leaning 
hack in his chair 

Barry didn’t cut up in all the 
classes 

Don didn’t know so much about 
everything 

Rob didn’t want to he considered 
a star athlete 


\'ic didn’t have so much fun in 
Art Class 

Jay didn’t snicker at every de¬ 
tention given out 

Nick didn’t hlush every time he 
was called St. Nick by Mr, G. 

Danny didn’t ])ick on Yours Tru¬ 
ly (D.C.) in (leography class 

l*ay didn’t want the V.C. for 
hoard erasing and writing 
down names 

Jim (Perky) didn’t doze off in 
History and get scared at the 
hoard 

Chris didn’t know World War I 
and II upside down, sideways, 
forwards ancl backwards 

John didn’t luipe to follow in his 
brother’s f(M)lsteps — brother 
designed cover for last year’s 
Rehelogue 

Heinz didn’t tell every one not 
to worry about Math tests (he 
got 1009 ^ on one) 

Linda didn’t think she could out¬ 
play a whole haskethall team 
i>y herself 


*age Fifty 


CLASS COLUMN 9B 

A is for Adair, whose hair is 
blonde, 

That is the reason the boys are 
so fond, 

Ambrose is pcilcd with a capita) 
A, 

And everything he does turns 
out that way. 

Archil)ald, a tigress at heart, 

Can’t compare with Allen’s 
great part. 

B holds a mixture of all differ¬ 
ent types— 

Brown and Bastion are two 
hard working types. 

While Bertram sings out with 
her quaint “no guff.” 

r^ates is already beginning to 
cough, 

Burkhart is quiet, Beaudoin is 
too— 

It s a shame that Barron and 
Budwin aren’t too. 

Coulson leads the class in math; 
We hope no one follows in her 
desperate path. 


Calcott is noted for removing her 
shoes. 

While Crai^ is always in the 
blues (about her boy-friends) 

Clifford and Camubell lead the 
gab 

1 o make 91-5 the worst class 
in the lab. 

Douglas. Davy, and De Wolfe 
may frown, 

But that isn’t often for they’re 
usually clowns. 

Drury stands apart from the rest 
of the I)’s 

By being reserved and alwavs 
at ease. 

E stands alone with only one 
name— 

Kmmot, for History is how he 
wins fame. 

G is for (ireary, T-o-m-m-y, 

His waist is substantial and his 
I.Q. high, 

G is for Gratto. B-o-b-b-y, 

With the girls he’s very shy. 

G is for Gosling whose nick¬ 
name is “Goose,” 

His cheery smile is always put 
to use. 


H is for Handy, who thinks too 
hard, 

Harrison in memory-work is 
really a card, 

Harvey and Mann we call “math- 
laughers,” 

While McCallum relates of the 
body-snatchers. 

Now, this is the spot in our gala 
feature 

That we have reserved for our 
home room teacher. 

Mr. Melville has us tame 
To his detentions and multi¬ 
plication game. 

Wynarchuk and Smith are verv 
quiet, 

l^ut Shuker is alwavs causing 
a riot! 

Last in this parade of stars is 
Yared, 

Small and smart, he’s never 
scar-ed 

To be the best gossip in the hall, 
And so this concludes our j)re- 
view of all, 

(lossip Lovers, 

Wayne Yared, Cathy Calcott, 

Tom Geary. 


MILLAR DRUG STORE 


Prescriptions 

Phone WH 5-4293 
LAUZON ROAD AT WYANDOTTE 
Riverside, Ontario 


ST. ROSE FI.ORIST 

2409 Wyandotte St. 
Riverside 

Corsages — Cut Flowers 
Weddings — Funeral Designs 
Hospital and Home Arrangements 

Riverside’s Only Florist 


WH 5-5474 



P-nge Fifty-one 


I 




ol 

D. M. DUNCAN 

MACHINERY CO. LTD. 


i 




RIVERSIDE BAR-B-Q 

We Specialize 

Barbecued Chicken, Spare Ribs, 

Pizza 

Free Home Delivery in Riverside 
274 Lauzon Rd. WH 5-3923 

(Near Wyandotte) 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

LAZARE’S FURS 
Western Ontario’s Largest Furriers 
493 Ouellette Windsor, Ont. 


CLASS COLUMN 9C 


There are some things 1 wouhl 
like to see 

About the students of 9C. 

Liza and Brenda never flirt. 
They donT need to with their 
short skirts. 

Linda (»az(> is on the ball 
To trap boys, both sliort and tall. 
Hut Gail Evans is really wise 
She can also trap the guys. 
Carol r*earce is known to be cpiiet 
But mention Alan Phillips and 
she starts a riot. 

(jordon and Don are full of zest 
But do you think they will pass a 
French test? 

I\lliot and Mike think Wayne is 
insane 

While the French teacher tries 
to keep him tame. 

John Wetberup from Bus. Pract. 

has dropped out, 

Of this there is no doubt. 

Cheryl and Hugh use their heads 
While Barry Jones just needs a 
bed. 


If Ken or Brjan ever had a dou¬ 
ble 

Barb says we’d be in for trouble. 

Diane and Marilyn are quite a 
pair 

Aline tries to sec who has the 
bushiest hair. 

Donna and Marilyn are really 
the brains 

But Frank is slowly driving them 
insane. 

I^at l?atrick’s case is really sad. 

Because she’s a reader of “Mad.” 

Barbara Fields is the (piietcst of 
all 

While Bob Manor sings in the 
hall. 

Carol Fotheringham is kind of 
shy. 

But we l)et she has met a real 
nice guy. 

Sharon Pretty it seems, 

Doesn’t know where to put her 
nylon seams. 

Jill Sgrazzitti is a sweet child 


.Mthough at times she gets (juite 
wild. 

Roger Linton wears several Bob¬ 
by Pins, 

Too bad his hair looks like Rin 
Tin Tin*.s. 

.\bout Cathy Fowkes of course 
she’s not mad 

But when it comes to Richard she 
really turns glad. 

Everyone knows that we like Bill 

For when he dies, we’ll get his 
Will. 

Heather and fieri make little 
noise 

But one thing for sure they at¬ 
tract all the boys. 

.\bout Lee Cutler Pd rather not 
mention, 

But her stpieaky laugh caught my 
attention. 

.\nd we the students of 9C, 

.Agree that Afr. Wilkinson tea¬ 
ches expertly. 

John Wetherup, 9C 


Page Fifty-two 





CLASS COLUMN 9D 

91) wuudn’t l)<! the same if: 

Cheryl Brown weren’t always 
absent. 

Alan Coulson didn’t amuse our 
class with his “horsy” laiij^h. 

Don Ferguson weren’t always 
repeating memory-work. 

Janice Gohni didn’t talk so much. 

Peggy Haley weren’t able to 
answer so many .science <|ues- 
tions. 

Marilyn Handsor didn’t like 
Home Ec., but we doubt that 
she’ll ever make a good cook. 

Tom Hawkins didn’t enjoy those 
arm exercises in P.T. 

Gail Hillman weren’t always los¬ 
ing her ^^famous” wallet. 

Gary Huckle weren’t the 91) His¬ 
tory Hero. Nickname-“Fabu- 
lous Fabian Huckle.” 

Pat Hutchison weren’t our er¬ 
rand girl. 

Ruth Kidd weren’t our all .\meri- 
can girl. 


Denjiis Kostescu (Dennis the 
Menace) tried to improve his 
report marks. 

Uta Kuhn wen: able to control 
her laughing. 

Connie Larking didn’t write Ron 
nie Wilkins all over her book.s. 

Carol Little didn’t come to school 
with all her new air-dos. 

Ken Matthew weren’t always 
singing “Choo-Choo Charlie.” 

Roger Mans and all the little 
m.oose weren’t cracking jokes 
to Jaye and Connie. 

Linda Maxwell didn’t look .so 
studious. 

Doug Mercer (editor) had some¬ 
one to sit with in (leography 
class. 

Ivarl Morris had his homework 

assignments completed. 

Ian Niemi didn’t throw water at 
the girls when they entered the 
Science class. 

l*hilpi Ochs weren’t dreaming of 
beating Mr. Wilkinson in a 
ping-pong game. 

Wayne (^coli.san didn’t always 
use “if” in the English class. 


Joan Orthner weren’t such a 
great mathematician. 

Peter Perkins hadn’t told the girls 
he was cute, modest, but not 
conceited. 

Cheryl Peters didn’t sit with Cta 
in Cieography class. 

Peggy Polhill didn’t have the 
highest grade nine report mark. 

Cathy Prestanski weren’t so 
ticklish. 

Carrol Quick didn’t have a ner¬ 
vous habit of dropping books 
on Jaye’s head. 

Jaye Reid weren’t so happy when 
she comes into math class. 

Colin Rickerby weren’t nick¬ 
named “Herman.” 

Darlene Roy were to let the boys 
see her wallet. 

Hanko Senger didn’t say “Just 
call me Shorty.” 

Tom Tweney weren’t our Sea 
Sick Sailor (S.S.S.). 

Leslie Wilson weren’t called 
“Carrot-top.” 

Douglas Mercer 



— COMPLIMENTS OF — 

MR. MASCARO’S HOME ROOM 
— 9E — 

RETURN TO THE SUN 

1 .Stand on the shore. My face stares seaward: 
The crest of the sea breaks o’er the strand. 

To wash my silent feet. 

Clear horizon. That jewelled <irb, the sun. 
Sink.s deep to rest beneath the waves. 

.And tinted clouds unfold their hues 
To flood the sk} on the shadowy wings of night. 
The whip-lash spray of the sea green salt 
Stings my face in the settling dusk. 

And, as the gulls gather on homeward call, 

I know at last 1 am alone. 


GESTETNER (GAN.) LTD 


—Paul Hewitt, Grade 13 




LAKEVIEW PHARMACY 
Prescriptions, Cosmetics, School Supplies 
12211 Riverside Drive East 


RENNIE’S MUSIC 

Conn Electric Organs 




Tecumseh, Ont 


SE 5-4761 



□ 

Compliments 

of 

lOA 

□ 


The Finest Collection of 
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 
in Ontario 

128 University West 

CL 6-1018 CL 6-1803 


S S 

M Two Phones to Serve You E 

I TAYLOR’S MARKET ^ 

X Groceries, Meats, Fruits X 

ff and Frozen Food g 

G SMILING SERVICE E 

Phone WH 5-1131 1220 Wyandotte St 



CLASS COLUMN 9E 

So here you are at Nine E. 

The worst (irade Nine we hap¬ 
pen to be. 

j Hut here is our clas.s as we are 
I On Riverside we*ll sure leave a 
mark. 

It’s ten to nine the bell’s just 

rung. 

Into the classroom we’ll trot one 
by one, 

Christine Zettl is first here, we 
see 

Quietly she’ll sit until three- 
thirty. 

Next in line 

Is our rabble-rousing threesome 
Tom, Paul, and Brian, 

Next to drag himself to the top 
floor. 

Is Dave Stewart, Tom’s neigh- 
i hour. 

()ver in the corner by Diane’s 
desk our “Hockey Club“ is 
i forming. 


There’s Dennis ‘‘Autograph” 
Reaume with his Red Wing 
names. 

Rosemary “Skater” Cosh with 
her books of P^aine 

And Ces “Hlondie” Southward 
setting girls’ hearts all aflame, 

Jo Ami’s and Brenda’s boyfriends 
sure would pilch hay 

If they saw the boys they looked 
at from 11 A. 

Judy and Susan, an inseparalile 
pair 

Are coasting the halls with hoys 
for a care, 

Jim Allan is tall from his toes to 
his hair 

And Angela Irabelli has hen* 
friends to spare. 

Mary Williams (piite talented, 
must be 

When singing “Under the spread¬ 
ing lilac tree.” 

There are many couples in our 
class; by name 

Bonnie “(lood-humonred” Weiss 
and Bonnie Dnchene; 


Ken and Ron are onr Herman 
hoys, 

And our Basketball player is that 
famous Johnny Voy. 

Onr redheaded couple is Dave 
Ruch and Sandy, 

While a wise couple is Doug and 
Randy. 

Nine has some short ones also 

Gloria, Don Peters, and Eleanor, 
Oh, No! 

Bobby Wirch is (|iiite a strong¬ 
man. 

And another bov is “Never- 
b:arly” Dan. 

Linda, ^^argaret and Maureen 
follow alphabetically. 

While C*ail dreams of a certain 
Larry, 

Eleanor dreams of boys in 12A, 

While I yell “Appleby YAH.” 

Mr. Mascaro onr homeroom tea¬ 
cher 

Adds to onr class with patience 
and feature. 

Lorelei Tripp 


Page Fifty-four 



IMAGINATION 



This is the imagination: 

That l)ottomless pit l)etween now and 
Where angels stoke fires and devils p 
W here up is down, and down is up; 
This is a world where a thimble hold 
This is a world where the universe ca 
tain the miscroscopic. 

Here the impossible is possible; 

Here the unattainable is easily graspec 
\ ei this world is very near. 


PLYWOODS — VENEERS 


CABINET HARDWARE 


Kelliiigtoii Wood Products 


MILKMAID DAIRY BAR 

AND POST OFFICE 
1 Block East of St. Rose 
Riverside, Ontario 
TO THE GRADUATES .... 


May The Next Five Years 
Be As Successful 
As The Last Five 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
LEVER DRUG STORE 
Wyandotte at Reedmere 
Phone WH 5-2211 


SHANFIELD’S 

DRY GOODS AND SHOES 
Shanfield's Regular Prices are 
Others “Sale” Prices 


1224 Wyandotte 


Riverside 


This space donated by 9A 


MAC J. BRIAN LIMITED 


Your Plumber 


Page Fifty-five 







COMPLIMENTS 


Air Conditioned 
For Comfort 


Riverside Bowling Centre 

SEMI-AUTOMATIC PINSPOTTERS 

2611 Wyandotte St. E. Riverside, Ont. 

Special Rates For Student Leagues 

Anthony Tako Telephone WH 8-2372 

Pronrietor Res. WH 5-4536 


Coyle’s Jewellery & Gift Shop 
Gifts For All Occasions 
SCHOOL RINGS and CRESTS 
Guaranteed Watch and Clock Repairs 
Phone WH 5-1969 


FAITH 


Riverside, Ontario 


1409 Wyandotte 


Compliments of 

W. J. BONDY & SONS LTD 

Shoes for the Whole Family 


Windsor 


126 Ouellette Ave. 


ADELMAN’S UNDERSELLING 
DEPARTMENT STORE 


Windsor, Ontario 


60 Pitt Street 


E. G. MANOR CO. LTD. 
196 Pitt St. E. 
WINDSOR 

Preferred Heating Services 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


BAKER DAIRY BAR 


Corner of 

Villr.ire and Wyandotte 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
BATES HARDWARE LIMITED 
General Hardware—Kitchen Utensils 
1082 Wyandotte St. E. 1308 W 

Windsor, Ont. Rivers 

CL 4-2866 WH 





COMPLIMENTS OF 

AITKEN DRUG STORE 

2001 Wyandotte St. 
Phone WH 5-1962 


WHITEHALL PAINT & WALLPAPER 

2411 Wyandotte St, Corner of Virginia 
WH 8-2771 

“Fine Wallpapers and Paints” 


T//E NVT HOUSE 

419 Ouellette Ave. Dorwin Plaza 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

JOHNSTON CYCLE & SPORT CENTRE 

1405 Wyandotte St. at Esdras WH 5.3434 

Riverside, Ontario 


TWO BOOKS 

I Stared at two hooks on the shelf. 

One was shiny and new — the other, 

Tattered and torn. The former, a hook 
()f knowledj^e and science; the other, 

A popular, widely read novel 
I picked up tlic first and stunihled alonj^, 

For the writing was small and the words 
Were difficult. There was page upon page 
Of information — facts, diagrams and calcula¬ 
tions ; 

Hut, for the time being, 1 read on. 

Then my fancy turned towards the other. 

M'he print was hold and the words 
Were expressive. There was an exciting 
Plot and characters came alive. ^ 

I could not think of the other. 

Nv'v that many years and many 
Hooks have passed. T am proud to say, 

'Phat of the two hooks on the shelf 
1 finally chose the one least read. 

And I have profited from my choice. 

—Peter Syring, Grade 13 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

WOODALL CONSTRUCTION LTD. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 
Windsor, Oni 


STUDENTS 

Receive Special Attention At 

VARSITY 

SPORTS CENTRE LIMITED 

71 Riverside Drive West 
(at Ouellette Ave.) 

Gym Suits For Boys and Girls 
School Jackets, Crests, and Lettering 
Team Uniforms and Equipment 

“The Right Equipment For Every Sport" 


RUBY’S BEAUTY SALON 


3329 Wyandotte St 



Riverside 



WH 8-1362 


MR. 

GORSKI’S CLASS 

— 9D 

Gail 

Peggy H. 

Marilyn 

Ruth 

Gary 

Pat 

Connie 

Kenny 

Dennis 

Via 

Carol Lowe 

Doug 

Carol Little 

Linda 

Phil 

Roger 

Jan 

Pete 

Earl 

Joan 

Cathy 

Wayne 

Peggy P. 

Colin 

Cheryl P. 

Jaye 

Tom T. 

Carrol Q. 

Hanko 

Don 

Darlene 

Leslie 

Compliments of Nine 

64D»* 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


RIVERSIDE MARINE 

G. R. Bruce H. A. Bruce 


Page Fifty-seven 






320 Pelissier Street 
Your Record and Card Shop 
CL 2-0369 

BAILLIE’S MUSIC & CARD CENTRE 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

RIVERSIDE HARDWARE LTD. 

1118 Wyandotte East at Villaire 
Phone WH 5-1072 J. Van Durocher 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

HAYNES 

REXALL PHARMACY 
Pillette and Wyandotte E. 

WH 5-8821 


Windsor, Ont. 
WH 5-5586 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

RAYMOND ALLAN 

Guilder — Hemodling 
201 Reedmere Rd. 


Riverside, OnL 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

JOHNSTEL METAL PRODUCTS 


LTD. 


WINDSOR 


ONTARIO 


2-Way Radios Insured Cabs 

Small Parcels and Messages Delivered 

RIVERSIDE WH 

TAXI 5-3311 

Prop. Arley Mineau, 2623 Wyandotte St. 

WH 5-0477 

“SERVICE WITH A SMILE” 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
The Oldest Club in the School 
Inter-School Christian Fellowship 
“To Know Christ and to Make Him Known” 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

11B 


HALCYON SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
Phone CL 4-9303 
Teachers of String Instruments 
55 University Avenue Windsor, Ontario 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

RIVERSIDE BARBER SHOP 

Stevie Kmit, Prop. 

1417 Wyandotte St E. WH 5-1779 

Riverside. Ontario 


SOCIETY '61 

What is ii]> and upper-up? 

The former dine and the latter sup. 

I must admit the castes today 
Coufuse me in a hopeless way. 

For where am I on the merry-go-round? 
Downer-up or upper-dowu? 

—Peter Wakefield, Grade 13 


Page PMfty-eight 



LITERARY 


A CURIOUS CASTLE 

Ihe castle was surrounded by a square mile of woods, clearings and streams which here and 
there were dotted with little groups of people in various costumes. 

As I pushed open the huge door my companion explained that I was to be prej)ared for surprises. 

Just as the words left his mouth, I heard a pistol shot and my companion fell to the floor. This 
\\as certainly the unexpected and, as 1 looked around for some aid, a United States Marshall al¬ 
most seven feet tall strode up to me and asked me what I was doing in Carson City and why I shot 
the man 1 was struggling with. I tried to explain but of course it was useless and the seven foot Mar¬ 
shall handed me over to the District Attorney who attempted to force me by all methods under his 
power to confess the murder. However, with Perry Mason as my lawyer, 1 could not have possibly 
been declared guilty and, after much deliberation, I was set free. 

^ emerged from the courtroom 1 was conffronted by another giant who was grotesquelv 
clothed in fins, a rubber suit and diving mask. He apparently did not see me because he was so 
occupied with bringing another victim up to the courtroom from the bottom of the sea. I wished the 
poor prisoner luck and told him Perry Mason could talk his way out of anything and to get him for 
a lawyer. 

As^l strolled along the corridor, from behind several closed doors, came the sounds of family 
arguments, more shootings, children playing and, here and there, the occasional weeping of some 
lady in distress. Out of curiosity 1 cautiously pushed open one of the doors and jieeped in. All was 
quiet, and 1 could see a small boy asleep in a bed with a dog beside him. As 1 opened the door the 
dog eyed me with a look of defiance and then suddenly sprung at me with a lurch. It felt as if I had 
been attacked by both Lassie and Kin Tin Tin but I heard the little boy call the dog using the name 
Cleo, and the dog muttered as he trotted back towards the bed, 

“And I almost had him down.” 

1 left the room quickly, thinking I was interrupting the little boy’s sleep. As 1 continued along 
the corridor I saw a weak little man practising swinging on long vines and just a little further on 
another rather poor looking specimen j>racftising quick changes. As I passed, his time had narrowed 
down to three minutes but he needed much more practice. 

The last room I entered was larger than the rest but 1 cannot express my surprise at the sight 
which met my eyes. Several women were washing dishes wearing one rubber glove; others were 
modeling coats from Roliert Hall; still others were flicking curls for Silvikrin and washing everv- 
thing from puppies to walls with Tide. The results of their experiments were meticulously recorded 
by men who asked (jnestions and compared their brand with Brand X. 

Suddenly I had the feeling that 1 had to get out of this unusual place and 1 left the curious castle 
with its more tlmn curious inhabitants to continue these odd occupations in peace. 

Elizabeth Day 


fr 


Page Fifty-nine 


AUTOGRAPH 


Page Sixty 































Compliments of 

TOWN OF RIVERSIDE 


MAYOR GORDON R. STEWART 


Councillors 

B. A. Ballard 

C. Watson 


S. Barker 
H. Shanfield 


G. A. Taylor 


Clerk Treasurer - R. A. Everett 


Compliments of 

RIVERSIDE 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 


A 

m 

. Mr. E E Va«l. 

Vlce-Cl.alru.an .. Dr.D.M.MlIl8 

E E BumeU Mre. C. Davto J, t. w. St Aubin 

E J. CuHer A. p. Janteac w. stoneman 

S«Tcta.y.Trca.«rer ... colaboumc 






















For Reference U 

^ Do Not Take From the Library 

¥ - - ■■ 

7 , ' ^ » 





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I 

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